Lecture and Speech of Acceptance, Upon the Award of the Nobel Prize, Delivered in Stockholm in December 2003

Front Cover
Penguin Books, 2004 - Fiction - 26 pages
2 Reviews
In his acceptance speech for the 2003 Nobel Prize in Literature, J. M. Coetzee delivered an intriguing and enigmatic short story, ?He and His Man.? The story features Robinson Crusoe, long after his return from the island, reflecting on death and spectacle, writing and allegory, solitude and sociability, as he searches his mind for some true understanding of the ?man? who writes of and for him. In the spare and powerful prose for which Coetzee is renowned, The Nobel Lecture in Literature, 2003 is a provocative testament to the uncompromising vision of one of the world?s most profound writers.

From inside the book

What people are saying - Write a review

Review: The Nobel Lecture in Literature, 2003

User Review  - -- - Goodreads

What a ripoff. It's just a dumb re-take on Robinson Crusoe, and it's not even that good. I feel a bit like I did when Margaret Atwood came to speak at my college and she just read an environmentalist ... Read full review

Review: The Nobel Lecture in Literature, 2003

User Review  - Ruth - Goodreads

YES. Read full review

Common terms and phrases

About the author (2004)

Born in Cape Town, South Africa, on February 9, 1940, John Michael Coetzee studied first at Cape Town and later at the University of Texas at Austin, where he earned a Ph.D. degree in literature. In 1972 he returned to South Africa and joined the faculty of the University of Cape Town. His works of fiction include Dusklands, Waiting for the Barbarians, which won South Africa's highest literary honor, the Central News Agency Literary Award, and the Life and Times of Michael K., for which Coetzee was awarded his first Booker Prize in 1983. He has also published a memoir, Boyhood: Scenes From a Provincial Life, and several essays collections. He has won many other literary prizes including the Lannan Award for Fiction, the Jerusalem Prize and The Irish Times International Fiction Prize. In 1999 he again won Britain's prestigious Booker Prize for Disgrace, becoming the first author to win the award twice in its 31-year history. In 2003, Coetzee was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature.

Bibliographic information