Narrative of the second campaign in China (Google eBook)

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R. Bentley, 1842 - History - 253 pages
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Page 213 - The Plenipotentiary now permits himself to make a few general observations. The oblivion of past and redressed injuries will follow naturally from the right feeling of the Queen's subjects. Indeed, it should be remembered that no extent of modification resulting only from political intervention can be efficacious in the steady improvement of our condition, unless it be systematically seconded by conciliatory treatment of the people and becoming deference for the institutions and government of the...
Page 250 - ... offence ; and, for his life, what is it, that he should be cared for or pitied ! But if it be in not acting so as to meet the gracious approbation of his sovereign that he becomes guilty, the province and the people have yet their sacred sovereign to look to and rely upon for happiness, protection, justice, and peace. Whereas, if his guilt should lie in giving battle when unable to command a victory, then will the celestial dignity of the throne be sullied, the lives of the people sacrificed,...
Page 210 - Still it is feared that, as the military hosts are gathered in clouds, the merchants of all nations here engaged in commerce hearing thereof will tremble with alarm, not knowing where these things will end. Some, frightened out of their wits, may abandon their goods and secretly go away; and others may not know whether to expect quiet or danger, while all cherish their fearful apprehensions. Those foreign merchants who are respectfully obedient, are viewed...
Page 214 - China ; and to that rare union of ardour, patience, and forbearance, which has distinguished the officers and forces of all arms at all points of occupation and operation. He is well assured the British community will sympathize cordially with him in their sentiments of lasting respect for his Excellency and the whole force, which he is ashamed lo express in such inadequate language.
Page 213 - British ships and merchants, and he is only performing his duty in offering the protection of the British flag to the subjects, citizens, and ships of foreign powers that may resort to her Majesty's possession. Pending her Majesty's further pleasure, there will be no port or other charges to the British government.
Page 251 - ... justice, and peace. Whereas, if his guilt should lie in giving battle when unable to command a victory, then will the celestial dignity of the throne be sullied, the lives of the people sacrificed, and for further proceedings and arrangements it will be, in an increased degree, impossible to find resource. Entertaining these views, a council has been held of all the officers in the city ; namely, the general and lieutenant-generals of the garrison, the lieutenant-governor, the literary chancellor,...
Page 248 - Hereby may be seen, in a great measure, the character of the Canton soldiery. And, supposing when we had joined battle, just at the most critical moment, these marine forces were not to stand firm, the consequences would be most disastrous. For although we should have our veteran troops serving with them, yet these would have no opportunity of bringing their skill into play. Still further, our ships of war are not large and strong, and it is difficult to mount heavy guns on board them. By these observations,...
Page 237 - English foreigners have despatched a person to Chekeang province to deliver back Tinghae, how that they have restored to us the forts of Shakok and Taikok, in the province of Kwangtung, along with the vessels of war and salt-junks which they had previously captured, all which have been...
Page 244 - Having changed his boat for a sea-going vessel, your slave stood out for the Bocca Tigris ; and, there arrived, he made a most careful inspection of every fort and battery in the place. Such forts as did not...

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