The Declaration of Independence

Front Cover
Scholastic Inc., 2002 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 160 pages
1 Review
Taken phrase by phrase, inscribed and illustrated, these most famous words ring as true today as they did more than 200 years ago.

The Declaration of Independence is considered to be one of the greatest documents of all time. The central section of the declaration is a ringing assertion that every human being has an equal right to life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. These are the words that have built your nation and keep it strong.

Here is the complete Declaration of Independence beautifully hand-lettered and decorated. Almost every section is highlighted on its own page, with its meaning and significance enhanced by imaginative drawings and sketches appropriate to the all-important words they complement.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

I
7
II
146
III
150
IV
154
V
158
VI
159
VII
160
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

The Nigerian Americans
Kalu Ogbaa
Limited preview - 2003
All Book Search results »

About the author (2002)

Politician, philosopher, farmer, architect, and author, Jefferson was born to Peter and Jane Randolph Jefferson on April 13, 1743, in Tuckahoe, Virginia. As Jefferson observed in his autobiography, his parents could "trace their pedigree far back in England and Scotland." At the age of 16, Thomas Jefferson entered William and Mary College; at age 24, Jefferson was admitted to the bar; at 25, he was elected to the Virginia Assembly. Renowned for his political contributions to the American colonies, and later, to the embryonic Republic, Jefferson published in 1774 A Summary View of the Rights of British America, celebrating the inalienable natural rights claimed by the colonialists. In 1775 Jefferson was elected to the Continental Congress; in 1776 he joined the five-person committee responsible for drafting the Declaration of Independence---a document that is widely regarded as being largely Jefferson's own work. In 1779 Jefferson was elected governor of the state of Virginia, and in subsequent years he distinguished himself both as a cosmopolitan international politician and as a man committed to the future of Virginia. In 1789 he was appointed U.S. secretary of state, in 1797 he served as vice president under President John Adams, and in 1801 he was elected third president of the United States. Jefferson's literary career was no less stellar than his political accomplishments. He authored tracts and books on such diverse subjects as gardening, the life of Jesus, the history of Virginia, and the practices of farming. The precise descriptions of nature that inform his Notes on the State of Virginia (1787) are frequently credited with foreshadowing the Hudson River school of aesthetics. Thomas Jefferson died on the fourth of July. His grave marker, engraved with words of his own choosing, states, "Here lies Thomas Jefferson, Author of the Declaration of American Independence, of the Statute of Virginia for Religious Freedom and Father of the University of Virginia.

Sam Fink is an original. A multi-talented artist of inimitable range, Sam first learned to hand-letter from his father. After marrying his lovely wife Adele, they raised two sons while he studied at the National Academy and the Art Students' League. For two decades Sam worked as an art director at Young & Rubicam, the world-renowned advertising agency. Later, he taught his craft at the Pratt Institute and made professional contributions to the Lands' End catalog.
For the past twenty-plus years, Sam has both educated and entertained adults and children with his vibrantly illustrated texts of American history. He celebrated his 90th birthday in 2006 with the release of "The Constitution of the United States of America" (Welcome Books) to great acclaim. He has also published "The Declaration of Independence: The Words that Made America "(Scholastic), and Welcome Books will publish Sam's exquisite "The Book of Exodus" in 2007.

Bibliographic information