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" The waters have gone over me. But out of the black depths, could I be heard, I would cry out to all those who have but set a foot in the perilous flood. "
Plain Facts for Old and Young - Page 381
by John Harvey Kellogg - 1882 - 512 pages
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Atheneum, Or, Spirit of the English Magazines, Volume 12

1823
...I wept, because I thought of my own condition. Of that there is no hope that it should ever change. The waters have gone over me. But out of the black depths, could I be heard, I wouldv cry out to all those who have but set a foot in the perilous flood. Could the youth to whom...
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The London Magazine, Volume 6

John Scott, John Taylor - Literary Criticism - 1822
...wept, because I thought of my own condition. Of thai there is no hope that it should ever change. Tim waters have gone over me. But out of the black depths, could I be hoard, I would cry out to all those who have but set a foot in the perilous flood. Could the youth,...
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The Quarterly Review VOL.XXVII April&July

The Quarterly Review VOL.XXVII April&July - 1822
...connectedly as the entire original. ' Of my condition there is no hope that it should ever change ; the waters have gone over me ; but out of the black depths could 1 be heard, I would cry out to all those who have but set a toot in the perilous flood. Could the youth...
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The Quarterly Review, Volume 27

William Gifford, Sir John Taylor Coleridge, John Gibson Lockhart, Whitwell Elwin, William Macpherson, William Smith, Sir John Murray IV, Rowland Edmund Prothero (Baron Ernle), George Walter Prothero - English literature - 1822
...as connectedly as the entire original. 'Of my condition there is no hope that it should ever change; the waters have gone over me ; but out of the black depths could 1 be heard, I would cry out to all those who have but set a loot in the perilous flood. Could the youth...
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The Flowers of Literature: Consisting of Selections from History ..., Volume 1

William Oxberry - English literature - 1824
...I wept, because I thought of my own condition. Of that there is no hope that it should ever change. The waters have gone over me. But out of the black depths, could I be heard, I would cry out to all those who have but set a foot in the perilous flood. Could the youth, to whom the flavour...
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Saturday night

Saturday night - 1824
...I wept, because I thought of my own condition. Of that there is no hope that it should ever change. The waters have gone over me. But out of the black depths, could I be heard, I would cry out to all those who have but seta foot in the perilous flood. Could the youth, to whom the flavour...
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Elia: Essays which Have Appeared Under that Signature in the London Magazine ...

Charles Lamb - 1828 - 230 pages
...I wept, because I thought of my own condition. Of that there is no hope that it should ever change. The waters have gone over me. But out of the black depths, could I be heard, I would cry out to all those who have but set a foot in the perilous flood. Could the youth to whom the flavour...
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Elements of mental philosophy: abridged and designed as a text book for ...

Thomas Cogswell Upham - Philosophy - 1832 - 600 pages
...And what does the writer say ?"Ol'iuv condition there is no hope that it should ever change ; tin; waters have gone over me ; but out of the black depths could I be heard, I would cry out to all those who have but set a foot in the perilous flood. Could the youth to whom the flavour...
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The Republic of Letters: A Weekly Republication of Standard Literature, Volume 3

English literature - 1835
...I wept, because I thought of my own condition. Of that there is no hope that it should ever change. The waters have gone over me. But out of the black depths, could I be heard, I would cry out to all those who have but set a foot in the perilous flood. Could the youth to whom the flavour...
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The Republic of Letters: A Weekly Republication of Standard Literature, Volume 3

Literary Criticism - 1835
...wept, because I thought of my own condition. Of that there is no hope that it slrould ever change. The waters have gone over me. But out of the black depths, could I be heard, I would cry out to all those who have but set a foot in the perilous flood. Could the youth to whom the flavour...
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