Deceiving the Deceivers: Kim Philby, Donald Maclean, and Guy Burgess (Google eBook)

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Yale University Press, Oct 1, 2008 - History - 320 pages
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Among the more sensational espionage cases of the Cold War were those of Moscow’s three British spies—Kim Philby, Donald Maclean, and Guy Burgess. In this riveting book, S. J. Hamrick draws on documentary evidence concealed for almost half a century in reconstructing the complex series of 1947–1951 events that led British intelligence to identify all three as Soviet agents.

Basing his argument primarily on the Venona archive of broken Soviet codes released in 1995–1996 as well as on complementary Moscow and London sources, Hamrick refutes the myth of MI5’s identification of Maclean as a Soviet agent in the spring of 1951. British intelligence knew far earlier that Maclean was Moscow’s agent and concealed that knowledge in a 1949–1951 counterespionage operation that deceived Philby and Burgess. Hamrick also introduces compelling evidence of a 1949–1950 British disinformation initiative using Philby to mislead Moscow on Anglo-American retaliatory military capability in the event of Soviet aggression in Western Europe.

Engagingly written and impressively documented, Deceiving the Deceivers breaks new ground in reinterpreting the final espionage years of three infamous spies and in clarifying fifty years of conjecture, confusion, and error in Anglo-American intelligence history.

  

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Contents

TWO
19
THREE
34
FOUR
62
FIVE
85
SIX
97
SEVEN
113
EIGHT
135
NINE
159
TEN
185
ELEVEN
204
TWELVE
228
THE MACLEAN CABLESTHIRD NSA VENONA RELEASE FEBRUARY 27 1996
233
MODINS MISTAKEN MEMOIRS
239
NOTES
245
INDEX
287
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Author Samuel J. Hamrick was born in Lubbock, Texas on October 19, 1929. He graduated from the University of Louisville in Kentucky and served in the counterintelligence service of the Army. While working at the State Department, he served in the United States embassies in Lebanon, Congo, Somalia and Ethiopia. In 1980, he left the State Department and published his first novel, The Man Who Lost the War, using the pseudonym W. T. Tyler. He wrote one book using his own name which was entitled Deceiving the Deceivers. He died from colon cancer on February 29, 2008.

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