Red and Black (Google eBook)

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Doubleday, Page, 1919 - 381 pages
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Page 230 - KNOW ye not that they which run in a race run all, but one receiveth the prize ? So run, that ye may obtain. And every man that striveth for the mastery is temperate in all things. Now they do it to obtain a corruptible crown ; but we an incorruptible. I therefore so run, not as uncertainly ; so fight I, not as one that beateth the air : but I keep under my body, and bring it into subjection : lest that by any means, when I have preached to others, I myself should be a castaway.
Page 288 - And He bearing His cross went forth into a place called the place of a skull, which is called in the Hebrew Golgotha: where they crucified Him, and two other with Him, on either side one, and JESUS in the midst.
Page 288 - What happens to a man when he gives himself to a work like this when all that he is or ever hopes to be, he lays upon the altar? Human he may be, and weak; utterly inadequate, as far as his own power goes, to do the thing he longs to do, and yet well, many a man knows what it is to feel his spirit suddenly strengthened with the hour of need, to feel pour into it something intangible, yet absolutely real and definite and divine; to know himself, able to take the minds, the hearts, the wills...
Page 41 - was quite natural in a pretty young woman." As to her personal graces, he had been known to sum them up thus: "There is not too much of Nelly not half so much as there was of my last wife, Chloe, but, what there...
Page 288 - ... their discharge, and thus make unnecessary most of the relief by voluntary societies on the outside. The conditions suggest the remedy. Why cannot this be done? Mrs. Rinehart, in speaking of the work of one who was to be an army chaplain, wrote, "What happens to a man when he gives himself to a work like this when all that he is or ever hopes to be, he lays upon the altar? Human he may be, and weak; utterly inadequate, as far as his own power goes, to do the thing he longs to do, and yet...
Page 38 - I don't hold with offending people who have as good a right to their opinions as he has. I saw Johnstone wriggling more than once, toward the last and he's about the last man we want to make mad.

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