Stories of Standard Teaching Pieces: Containing Educational Notes and Legends Pertaining to the Best Known and Most Useful Pianoforte Compositions in General Use by Students of Music and Designed as a Companion Volume to the Author's "Descriptive Analyses of Pianoforte Compositions" (Google eBook)

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Theo. Presser Company, 1910 - Piano music - 226 pages
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Page 34 - And after April, when May follows, And the whitethroat builds, and all the swallows ! Hark, where my blossomed pear-tree in the hedge Leans to the field and scatters on the clover Blossoms and dewdrops - at the bent spray's edge That's the wise thrush; he sings each song twice over, Lest you should think he never could recapture The first fine careless rapture...
Page 68 - It is the hour when lovers' vows Seem sweet in every whisper'd word ; And gentle winds, and waters near, Make music to the lonely ear. Each flower the dews have lightly wet, And in the sky the stars are met, And on the wave is deeper blue, And on the leaf a browner hue, And in the heaven that clear obscure, So softly dark, and darkly pure, Which follows the decline of day, As twilight melts beneath the moon away.
Page 197 - I am distressed for thee, my brother Jonathan: very pleasant hast thou been unto me: thy love to me was wonderful, passing the love of women.
Page 34 - Hark, where my blossomed pear-tree in the hedge Leans to the field and scatters on the clover Blossoms and dewdrops at the bent spray's edge- That's the wise thrush; he sings each song twice over, Lest you should think he never could recapture The first fine careless rapture!
Page 141 - THE night has a thousand eyes, And the day but one; Yet the light of the bright world dies With the dying sun. The mind has a thousand eyes, And the heart but one; Yet the light of a whole life dies When love is done.
Page 40 - Not the gaily-jewelled dead Tempt the waters from their bed; For no ripples curl, alas ! Along that wilderness of glass; No swellings tell that winds may be Upon some far-off happier sea; No heavings hint that winds have been On seas less hideously serene.
Page 34 - OH, TO BE in England Now that April's there, And whoever wakes in England Sees, some morning, unaware, That the lowest boughs and the brushwood sheaf Round the elm-tree bole are in tiny leaf, While the chaffinch sings on the orchard bough In England - now...
Page 159 - Then would he smile again to stay her tears, And bid the vinas sound ; but once they set A stringed gourd on the sill, there where the wind Could linger o'er its notes and play at will...
Page 162 - I do for my roses' sweetness, The summer round For all my Garden's divine completeness Of scent and sound ? I will leave my Garden for winds to harry ; Where once was peace, Let the bramble-vine and the wild brier marry, And greatly increase. But I will go to a land men know not A far, still land, Where no birds come, and where roses blow not And no trees stand Where no fruit grows, where no spring makes riot, But, row on row, Heavy, and red, and pregnant with quiet The poppies blow....
Page 160 - Lo ! as the wind is so is mortal life A moan, a sigh, a sob, a storm, a strife. Wherefore and whence we are ye cannot know ; Nor where life springs nor whither life doth go. We are as ye are, ghosts from the inane ; What pleasure have we of our changeful pain ? What pleasure hast thou of thy changeless bliss ? Nay, if love lasted, there were joy in this ; But life's way is the wind's way, all these things Are but brief voices breathed on shifting strings.

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