The Foundations of Arithmetic: A Logico-Mathematical Enquiry Into the Concept of Number

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Northwestern University Press, Dec 1, 1980 - Mathematics - 119 pages
10 Reviews
The Foundations of Arithmetic is undoubtedly the best introduction to Frege's thought; it is here that Frege expounds the central notions of his philosophy, subjecting the views of his predecessors and contemporaries to devastating analysis. The book represents the first philosophically sound discussion of the concept of number in Western civilization. It profoundly influenced developments in the philosophy of mathematics and in general ontology.
  

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Review: The Foundations of Arithmetic: A Logico-Mathematical Enquiry into the Concept of Number

User Review  - Jackie - Goodreads

This was a fun read. Unfortunately, Frege does some hand-waving throughout the book. He is attempting to show that arithmetic is an extension of logic. Critical to his argument is the definition of ... Read full review

Review: The Foundations of Arithmetic: A Logico-Mathematical Enquiry into the Concept of Number

User Review  - Steven Dunn - Goodreads

I bought the book at a used bookstore for 15$ (sort of ridiculous). But, after reading Anthony Kenny's exposition of Frege, I can say the book was interesting and not that much of a difficult read. If ... Read full review

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About the author (1980)

Friedrich Ludwig Gottlob Frege (8 November 1848 – 26 July 1925, pronounced [ˈɡɔtloːp ˈfreːɡə ]) was a German mathematician, logician and philosopher. He is considered to be one of the founders of modern logic and made major contributions to the foundations of mathematics. He is generally considered to be the father of analytic philosophy, for his writings on the philosophy of language and mathematics. While he was mainly ignored by the intellectual world when he published his writings, Giuseppe Peano (1858–1932) and Bertrand Russell (1872–1970) introduced his work to later generations of logicians and philosophers.

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