History of the New York Times, 1851-1921 (Google eBook)

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New York Times, 1921 - New York times - 434 pages
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Page 194 - It will be my earnest aim that The New York Times give the news, all the news, in concise and attractive form, in language that is parliamentary in good society, and give it as early, if not earlier, than it can be learned through any other reliable medium; to give the news impartially, without fear or favor, regardless of party, sect, or interests involved; to make of the columns of The New York Times a forum for the consideration of all questions of public importance, and to that end to invite...
Page 195 - Times as a nonpartisan newspaper unless it be, if possible, to intensify its devotion to the cause of sound money and tariff reform, opposition to wastefulness and peculation in administering public affairs, and in its advocacy of the lowest tax consistent with good government, and no more government than is absolutely necessary to protect society, maintain individual and vested rights and assure the free exercise of a sound conscience.
Page 21 - We do not mean to write as if we were in a passion unless that shall really be the case, and we shall make it a point to get into a passion as rarely as possible.
Page 97 - We have come to the conclusion, and certify that the financial affairs of the city, under the charge of the controller, are administered in a correct and faithful manner.
Page xxi - be my earnest aim that The New York Times give the news, all the news, in concise and attractive form, in language that is permissible in good society, and give it as early, if not earlier than it can be learned through any other reliable medium; to give the news impartially, without fear or favor, regardless of party, sect, or interests involved...
Page 45 - Napoleon III. in 1859. Notwithstanding the toil spent by Austria on the spot, we should have learned that we are protected by a foreign fleet suddenly coming up on our question of citizenship. A canal cuts Mantua in two ; but we may rely on the most cordial cabinet minister of the new poiver in England.
Page xxii - Times a forum for the consideration of all questions of public importance, and to that end to invite intelligent discussion from all shades of opinion. There will be no radical changes in the personnel of the present efficient staff. Mr. Charles R. Miller, who has so ably for many years presided over the editorial...
Page 189 - In your management of the Chattanooga Times you have demonstrated such a faithful adherence to Democratic principles, and have so bravely supported the ideas and policies which tend to the safety of our country as well as of our party that I would be glad to see you in a larger sphere of usefulness.
Page 78 - Qtothis art of making a good newspaper, we need hardly say, he was a master. The Times under his management probably came nearer the newspaper of the good time coming than any other in existence...
Page 78 - ... or by the editor's personal feelings among reporters ; that it carried decency, temperance, and moderation into discussion, and banished personality from it; and thus not only supplied the only means by which rational beings can get at the truth, but helped to abate the greatest nuisance of the age, the coarseness, violence, calumny, which does so much to drive sensible...

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