Emma: A Novel (Google eBook)

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R. Bentley, 1841
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my name jane austen is fabulous

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Contents

I
1
II
10
III
15
IV
20
V
29
VI
35
VII
42
VIII
49
XXVIII
213
XXIX
219
XXX
228
XXXI
234
XXXII
239
XXXIII
249
XXXIV
257
XXXV
266

IX
60
X
73
XI
80
XII
86
XIII
95
XIV
103
XV
110
XVI
118
XVII
124
XVIII
127
XIX
135
XX
142
XXI
149
XXII
159
XXIII
164
XXIV
173
XXV
181
XXVI
187
XXVII
204
XXXVI
272
XXXVII
280
XXXVIII
283
XXXIX
295
XL
300
XLI
306
XLII
314
XLIII
328
XLIV
337
XLV
344
XLVI
351
XLVII
360
XLVIII
371
XLIX
379
L
388
LI
397
LII
404
LIII
413
LIV
421

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Page 1 - Emma Woodhouse, handsome, clever and rich, with a comfortable home and happy disposition, seemed to unite some of the best blessings of existence, and had lived nearly twenty-one years in the world with very little to distress or vex her.
Page 72 - And then their uncle comes in, and tosses them up to the ceiling in a very frightful way." " But they like it, papa ; there is nothing they like so much. It is such enjoyment to them, that if their uncle did not lay down the rule of their taking turns, which ever began would never give way to the other.
Page 18 - She was not struck by any thing remarkably clever in Miss Smith's conversation, but she found her altogether very engaging— not inconveniently shy, not unwilling to talk— and yet so far from pushing, shewing so proper and becoming a deference, seeming so pleasantly grateful for being admitted to Hartfield, and so artlessly impressed by the appearance of every thing in so superior a style to what she had been used to, that she must have good sense, and deserve encouragement.
Page 133 - Prejudiced! I am not prejudiced." "But I am very much, and without being at all ashamed of it. My love for Mr. and Mrs. Weston gives me a decided prejudice in his favour." "He is a person I never think of from one month's end to another,
Page 129 - There is one thing, Emma, which a man can always do, if he chuses, and that is, his duty; not by manoeuvring and finessing, but by vigour and resolution.
Page 335 - How could you be so unfeeling to Miss Bates? How could you be so insolent in your wit to a woman of her character, age, and situation?— Emma, I had not thought it possible.
Page 387 - Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised, or a little mistaken...
Page 320 - The house was larger than Hartfield, and totally unlike it, covering a good deal of ground, rambling and irregular, with many comfortable and one or two handsome rooms. - It was just what it ought to be, and it looked what it was - and Emma felt an increasing respect for it, as the residence of a family of such true gentility, untainted in blood and understanding.
Page 119 - How she could have been so deceived!— He protested that he had never thought seriously of Harriet— never! She looked back as well as she could; but it was all confusion. She had taken up the idea, she supposed, and made every thing bend to it. His manners, however, must have been unmarked, wavering, dubious, or she could not have been so misled. The picture!— How eager he had been about the picture!— and the charade!— and an hundred other circumstances;— how clearly they had seemed to...
Page 74 - My being charming, Harriet, is not quite enough to induce me to marry ; I must find other people charming — one other person at least. And I am not only not going to be married at present, but have very little intention of ever marrying at all.

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