Anne Frank: The Diary of a Young Girl

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Globe Book Company, 1992 - History - 318 pages
2132 Reviews

This classic series of plays, novels, and stories has been adapted, in a friendly format, for students reading at a various levels.

Reading Level: 4-8

Interest Level: 6-12

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Her writing was eloquent and her insights were astute. - Goodreads
I found this book very hard to read. - Goodreads
CLASSIC! Great intro for students - Goodreads
Its educational as well as a tragedy. - Goodreads
This book was given a 4/5 because it had a good plot. - Goodreads
The ending left me in a small outburst of tears. - Goodreads

Review: The Diary of a Young Girl

User Review  - Anamika Satheesh - Goodreads

Anne Frank,a 13 year old girl ends up hiding in an attic for being a Jew.Hitler's army floods through Amsterdam in order to kill Jews and Anne,along with her parents and sister,hide in the attic of ... Read full review

Review: The Diary of a Young Girl

User Review  - Miriam - Goodreads

One of the most heart-wrenching novels left in a long time - left me with a feeling of emptiness. Read full review

All 565 reviews »

Contents

School Days and Friendships
1
Going Into Hiding
14
The Van Daans Arrive
23
Copyright

31 other sections not shown

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About the author (1992)

Anne Frank, June 1929 - March 1945 Anneliesse Marie Frank was born on June 12, 1929 in Frankfurt-am-Main, Germany. She was the second daughter of Otto and Edith Frank. Anne's father was a factory worker, who moved his family to Amsterdam in 1933 to escape the Nazi's. There he opened up a branch of his uncle's company and Anne and her sister Margot resumed a normal life, attending a Montessori School in Amsterdam. The Germans attacked the Netherlands in 1940 and took control, issuing anti-Jewish decrees, and forcing the Frank sisters into a Jewish Lyceum instead of their old school. Their father Otto decided to find a place for the family to hide should the time come that the Nazi's came to take them to a concentration camp. He chose the annex above his offices and found some trustworthy friends among his fellow workers to supply the family with food and news. On July 5, 1942, Margot received a "call up" to serve in the Nazi "work camp." The next day, the family escaped to the annex, welcoming another family, the van Pels, which consisted of Hermann and Auguste van Pels and their son Peter. Fritz Pfeffer also came to stay with them, causing the count to come to eight people hiding in the annex. Anne, Margot and Peter continued their studies under the tutelage of Otto, and all of the captives found ways to entertain themselves for the long years they remained hidden. On August 4, 1944, four Dutch Nazis came to arrest the eight, having discovered their hiding place through an informant. Anne's diary was left behind and found later by one of the family's friends. The eight were taken to prison in Amsterdam and then deported to Westerbork before being shipped to Auschwitz. At Auschwitz, the men were separated from the women and Hermann van Pels was immediately gassed. Fritz Pfeffer died at Neuenganme in 1944. Anne, Margot and Mrs. van Pels were taken to Bergen-Belson, leaving behind Anne's mother, Edith, who died at Auschwitz of starvation and exhaustion in 1945. At Bergen-Belson, Anne and Margot contracted typhus and died of the disease in March of 1945. Anne was 15 and Margot was 17. The exact date and the place they were buried is unknown. Otto Frank was the only one of the original group of eight who were hidden in the annex to survive. He was left for dead at Auschwitz when the Russian Army came to liberate the camp. It is due to him that Anne's diary was published and became the success it is.

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