A History of Southern Missouri and Northern Arkansas: Being an Account of the Early Settlements, the Civil War, the Ku-Klux, and Times of Peace (Google eBook)

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West Plains Journal Company, 1907 - Arkansas - 247 pages
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Page 88 - The suffering that followed the women and children is indescribable. They had to drive their own teams, take care of the little ones, travel through the storms, exposed to it all without a man to help them, nor could they hear a single word of comfort spoken by husband, son or friend. On reaching the Federal lines, all vacant houses and places of shelter were soon filled, and they were known and styled 2 5 o 2 O r> O JO O tn O X O tn as refugees.
Page 58 - Listen! Do you hear the drums and the fife? That is General McBride's command moving west to kill them lop-eared Dutch that you Union men have brought into the state of Missouri. Do you know what we are going to do with such men as you are? Those of you that we don't hang, the first fight that we get into with the lop-eared Dutch, we will make breastworks out of to keep the bullets off of good...
Page 83 - The bodies fell into the coffinless graves and the earth was replaced. So the author is satisfied that the bones of these men still remain in the lonely earth underneath where they met their untimely death with no charge against them except that they had been feeding Union men, with no one to bury them but their wives and a few other women who aided. Some of the men who were in the scout and present when the hanging was done are still living in the counties of Howell and Oregon. A General Jackson...
Page 83 - O 5 z rock out and left Brown swinging in the air, went to the third rope, placed Russell on the rock, and just as they aimed to adjust the noose, word came that the home guards and Federals were right upon them in considerable force. They fled, leaving Russell standing upon the rock and both Brown and James dangling in the air.
Page 84 - You are not going to hurt my old man?" They said: "We just want him to go a piece with us over here.
Page 90 - ... food and raiment for their families. They were compelled to still be absent from their families, although they were suffering greatly for all of the necessaries of life and for clothing and shelter. The women's task of caring for and looking after the family and the little ones was just as great after they had reached the Federal lines as before.
Page 87 - Union families and notify them that they would not be allowed to remain; because if they let them stay, their men would be trying to come back, and they didn't believe both parties could live together.
Page 97 - Dutchmen and how he had his knife prepared to take that number of scalps before he came back home, and wanted to know if he got the scalps before he came home.
Page 98 - ... Prepare to meet them; if you are a better man than they are, down them and pile them up. '*' * At the command of Capt. Emmons, the four men advanced on Lusk, who did not attempt to move, seized him by the arms, led him to the log, bucked him over 'it, two holding him by the arms and two by the fegV, 'ordered the six men to advance, one at a time, strike three' licks with the flat side of the board, march on a few paces and give room for the next.
Page 83 - Every Union man now having fled in fear of his life, the next day the wives of Brown and James, with the help of a few other women, buried them as best they could. They dug graves underneath the swinging bodies, laid bed clothing in the graves and cut them loose. The bodies fell into the coffinless graves and the earth was replaced. So the author is satisfied that the bones of these men still remain in the lonely earth underneath where they met their untimely death with no charge against them except...

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