Canada. An Essay: To which was Awarded the First Prize by the Paris Exhibition Committee of Canada (Google eBook)

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B. Dawson, 1855 - Canada - 86 pages
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Page 54 - Stone or marble, in its crude or unwrought state. Slate. Butter, cheese, tallow. Lard, horns, manures. Ores of metals, of all kinds. Coal. Pitch, tar, turpentine, ashes. Timber and lumber, of all kinds, round, hewed, and sawed, unmanufactured in whole or in part.
Page 54 - Fish of all Kinds. * Products of Fish and of all other Creatures living in the Water. Poultry. Eggs. Hides, Furs, Skins, or Tails undressed. Stone or Marble in its crude or unwrought State.
Page 19 - Of all the British colonies, Canada is that whose exhibition is the most interesting and the most complete, and one may even say that it is superior, so far as the Mineral Kingdom is concerned, to all countries that have forwarded their productions to the Exhibition.
Page 84 - Council of Public Instruction for Upper Canada. " The municipal council of each county is responsible for raising at least an equal sum for salaries of teachers in the several townships within its jurisdiction with that which is annually apportioned to them out of the parliamentary appropriation by the Chief Superintendent of Schools. The county councils also appoint the local treasurers of the school fund, and the local superintendents of schools, and provide for their salaries. Special provision...
Page 85 - ... of it, and for the prompt payment of it to teachers at the times specified by law. Both the county and township councils have authority to raise any sums they shall think proper for public school libraries under general regulations prescribed according to law. A parliamentary appropriation has been made for the establishment of school libraries, to be expended on the same conditions with the appropriation for the support of schools. The law also provides a system adapted to the circumstances...
Page 86 - The system is to a great extent voluntary. Each municipality exercises its discretion as to whether it will or will not accept the parliamentary appropriation upon the conditions specified, and each school section does the same in regard to the terms on which aid is offered in support of its school. The general regulations and oversight are such as merely to secure a fulfilment in each locality of conditions which are required by the Legislature the collective wisdom and voice of the...
Page 86 - ... consideration of the Council ; prepares the forms of reports and modes of all school proceedings under the Act, and gives instructions for conducting them, as well as for holding teachers' institutes ; decides questions of dispute submitted to him ; takes the general superintendence of the Normal School ; provides facilities for procuring text and library books, and provides and recommends plans of...
Page 83 - The powers of Trustees are ample to enable them to do all that the interests of a good School require. They are the legal representatives and guardians of their section in School matters. They determine whatever sum or sums are necessary for the furnishing &c. of their School, and the salaries of Teachers, but account for its expenditure annually to their constituents, and report fully to the local Superintendent, by filling up blank forms of annual reports which are furnished to them by the Chief...
Page 80 - An Act to provide by one general Law for the erection of Municipal Corporations and the establishment of Regulations of Police in and for the several Counties, Cities, Towns, Townships and Villages in Upper Canada, and may fall due within the ten years next after the passing of this Act.
Page 83 - Councils, and who may be appointed for each county, or one for one or more townships, at the pleasure of each County Council. Each local Superintendent is entitled to at least one pound (four dollars) per annum for each school under his charge. He is required to visit each school, at least twice a year, and to deliver a public lecture on education in each school section once a year...

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