Europe and the Faith (Google eBook)

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Cosimo, Inc., Nov 1, 2007 - History - 188 pages
3 Reviews
First published in 1920, Europe and the Faith is Belloc's popular history of European civilization from the time of the Roman Empire. From the outset, the author's goal is clear. He intends to show readers how, through the Romans and Catholicism, Europe came to be in its present state: "Europe is the Church, and the Church is Europe." Students of both history and religion will find this treatise a quirky apology for the influence of Catholicism in Europe. French writer and thinker HILAIRE BELLOC (1870-1953) is known as "the man who wrote a library." He expounded extensively on a number of subjects, including French and British history, military strategy, satire, comic and serious verse, literary criticism, topography and travel, translations, and religious, social, and political commentary. Among his most famous works are The Path to Rome (1902) and Emmanuel Burden (1903).
  

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Review: Europe and the Faith

User Review  - Alyssa Watson - Goodreads

If the reader isn't catholic I don't think they will be convinced of the author's views but I think every reader- be they catholic or not- will appreciate learning to see how a European catholic would ... Read full review

Review: Europe and the Faith

User Review  - Chris - Goodreads

A masterpiece of Troll History. ;) Read full review

Contents

II
23
III
36
IV
56
V
75
VI
94
VII
127
VIII
140
IX
150
X
162
XI
176
Copyright

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Page 9 - Belloc's work which I have not yet mentioned. I mean its lucidity ; and it is this which makes him so effective a controversialist. He does indeed lack some of the arts of the preacher : he cannot, or will not, persuade : I say the Catholic " conscience " of History I say " conscience " that is, an intimate knowledge through identity : the intuition of a thing which is one with the Knower I do not say " The Catholic Aspect of History." This talk of " aspects " is modern, and therefore...
Page 10 - The Catholic brings to history (when I say "history" in these pages I mean the history of Christendom) self-knowledge. As a man in the confessional accuses himself of what he knows to be true and what other people cannot judge, so a Catholic, talking of the united European civilization, when he blames it, blames it for motives and for acts which are his own. He himself could have done those things in person. He is not relatively right in his blame, he is absolutely right. As a man can testify to...
Page 10 - Catholic as he reads that story does not grope at it from without, he understands it from within. He cannot understand it altogether because he is a finite being; but he is also that which he has to understand. The Faith is Europe and Europe is the Faith, The Catholic brings to history (when I say "history" in these pages I mean the history of Christendom) self-knowledge.
Page 11 - ... gross Asiatic and merchant empire of Carthage; what we derived from the light of Athens; what food we found in the Irish and the British, the Gallic tribes, their dim but awful memories of immortality, and even how ancient Israel . . . was, in the old dispensation at least, central and (as we Catholics say) sacred: devoted to a peculiar mission. For the Catholic the whole perspective falls into its proper order. The picture is normal. The procession of our great story is easy, natural, and full.12...
Page 10 - ... aspect, a Japanese aspect, and so forth. For all these look on Europe from without. The Catholic sees Europe from within. . . As a man can testify to his own motive so can the Catholic testify to unjust, irrelevant, or ignorant conceptions of the European story; for he knows why and how it proceeded. . . In a way that no other man can, he understands the Roman military effort; why that effort clashed with the gross Asiatic and merchant empire of Carthage; what we derived from the light of Athens;...
Page 9 - The Meaning of History, 22-25. there is no such thing as a Catholic aspect of European history. There is a Protestant aspect, a Jewish aspect, a Mohammedan aspect, a Japanese aspect, and so forth. For all these look on Europe from without. The Catholic sees Europe from within. . . As a man can testify to his own motive so can the Catholic testify to unjust, irrelevant, or ignorant conceptions of the European story; for he knows why and how it proceeded. . . In a way that no other man can, he understands...

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About the author (2007)

Hilaire Belloc, 1870 - 1953 Hilaire Belloc was born in France in 1870, educated at Oxford, and naturalized as a British subject in 1902. Although he began as a writer of humorous verse for children, his works include satire, poetry, history, biography, fiction, and many volumes of essays. With his close friend and fellow Catholic, G. K. Chesterton, Belloc founded the New Witness, a weekly newspaper opposing capitalism and free thought and supporting a philosophy known as distributism. The pair was so close in thought and association that George Bernard Shaw nicknamed them Chesterbelloc. During his life, Belloc published over 150 books. Today, however, he is best remembered for only a few works, most notably his light verse, such as Cautionary Tales (1907) and A Bad Child's Book of Beasts (1896). Belloc died in 1953 from burns caused when his dressing gown caught fire from the hearth.

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