Memoirs of the life of the Right Honorable Richard Brinsley Sheridan (Google eBook)

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H.D. Carey & I. Lea, 1825 - 602 pages
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Page 569 - Opera), the best farce (the Critic— it is only too good for a farce), and the best Address (Monologue on Garrick), and, to crown all, delivered the very best Oration (the famous Begum Speech) ever conceived or heard in this country.
Page 118 - I will own the colour true, When yielding blushes aid their hue. Is her hand so soft and pure? I must press it, to be sure; Nor can I be certain then, Till it, grateful, press again. Must I, with attentive eye, Watch her heaving bosom...
Page 144 - Well, I'll not debate how far scandal may be allowable ; but in a man, I am sure, it is always contemptible. We...
Page 174 - Pity it is, that the momentary beauties flowing from an harmonious elocution, cannot like those of poetry be their own record! That the animated graces of the player can live no longer than the instant breath and motion that presents them; or at best can but faintly glimmer through the memory, or imperfect attestation of a few surviving spectators.
Page 174 - The painter dead, yet still he charms the eye; While England lives, his fame can never die: But he who struts his hour upon the stage, Can scarce extend his fame for half an age; Nor pen nor pencil can the actor save, The art, and artist, share one common grave.
Page 168 - I don't say the sun shines all the day ; but, that he peeps now and then. Yet he does shine all the day, too, you know, though we don't see him.
Page 141 - ... the credit of a prudent lady of her stamp as a fever is generally to those of the strongest constitutions. But there is a sort of puny sickly reputation, that is always ailing, yet will outlive the robuster characters of a hundred prudes. Sir BEN.
Page 457 - ... in direct opposition to the declared sense of a great majority of the nation, and they should be put in force with all their rigorous provisions, if his opinion were asked by the people as to their obedience, he should tell them, that it was no longer a question of moral obligation and duty, but of prudence.
Page 584 - Was this, then, the fate of that high-gifted man, The pride of the palace, the bower, and the hall, The orator — dramatist — minstrel,— who ran Through each mode of the lyre, and was master of all...
Page 150 - Peter, because flowers are dear in cold weather? You should find fault with the climate, and not with me. For my part, I'm sure, I wish it was spring all the year round, and that roses grew under our feet!

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