Hard Labour: The Sociology of Parenthood

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McGraw-Hill International, Dec 1, 2004 - Social Science - 250 pages
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This innovative book examines changes in family practices and paid work in the 21st century. Focusing on highly qualified mothers who combine childcare with employment, it makes a valuable contribution to current debates. It also takes into account the views of fathers, making it a rounded study of family practice in the new millennium. Hard Labour puts forward some new and thought-provoking arguments about both mothers and fathers commitments to parenting and paid work. The first part of the book provides an up-to-date, comprehensive and readable overview of the literature on motherhood, fatherhood, family practices, and women in employment. The second part draws on a qualitative study of the lives of twenty mothers and their husbands or partners, each of whom is educated to degree level or above, and has at least one child under five.
  

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Contents

PART
2
PART1
13
Parents children and family lives
30
Domestic goddesses?
45
Moneybags and the invisible father
71
Working for love or money?
80
Doing it All and having some of it
95
Baby you changed my life
101
A labour of love and a sound investment
130
Everything I do I do for you
149
Everyone is equal
183
My children must become our children
206
References
217
Index
227
Copyright

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About the author (2004)

Caroline Gatrell is Lecturer in Management Learning and Leadership in the Management School at Lancaster University, UK. She is author of "Hard Labour: The Sociology of Parenthood" (Open University Press, 2005) and "Managing Part-time Study" (Open University Press, 2006).

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