Shakespeare's King Henry the Fourth, Part 2 (Google eBook)

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Harper & brothers, 1899 - 214 pages
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Page 108 - Between his greatness and thy other brethren. Therefore omit him not ; blunt not his love, Nor lose the good advantage of his grace By seeming cold or careless of his will, For he is gracious, if he be observ'd. ,v1 He hath a tear for pity and a hand Open as day for melting charity...
Page 57 - Windsor, thou didst swear to me then, as I was washing thy wound, to marry me and make me my lady thy wife. Canst thou deny it? Did not goodwife Keech, the butcher's wife, come in then and call me gossip Quickly?
Page 25 - Wilt thou upon the high and giddy mast Seal up the ship-boy's eyes, and rock his brains...
Page 117 - Therefore, my Harry, Be it thy course to busy giddy minds With foreign quarrels, that action, hence borne out, May waste the memory of the former days.
Page 106 - It ascends me into the brain; dries me there all the foolish and dull and crudy vapours which environ it; makes it apprehensive, quick, forgetive, full of nimble fiery and delectable shapes ; which, deliver'd o'er to the voice, the tongue, which is the birth, becomes excellent wit.
Page 80 - There is a history in all men's lives, Figuring the nature of the times deceas'd ; The which observ'd, a man may prophesy, With a near aim, of the main chance of things As yet not come to life, which in their seeds, And weak beginnings, lie in treasured. Such things become the hatch and brood of time ; And, by the necessary form of this, King Richard might create a perfect guess.
Page 205 - One word more, I beseech you. If you be not too much cloyed with fat meat, our humble author will continue the story with Sir John in it...
Page 24 - How many thousand of my poorest subjects Are at this hour asleep ! Sleep, gentle sleep, Nature's soft nurse, how have I frighted thee, That thou no more wilt weigh my eye-lids down, And steep my senses in forgetfulness...
Page 38 - Even such a man, so faint, so spiritless, So dull, so dead in look, so woe-begone, Drew Priam's curtain in the dead of night...
Page 9 - Falstaffe, and swaggering Pistoll. As it hath been sundrie times publikely acted by the right honourable, the Lord Chamberlaine his seruants. Written by William Shakespeare.

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