The Travels of William Bartram

Front Cover
University of Georgia Press, 1998 - Science - 727 pages
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For years, serious naturalists have treasured their copies of Francis Harper's naturalist's edition of The Travels of William Bartram as the definitive version of Bartram's pioneering survey. Complete with notes and commentary, an annotated index, maps, a bibliography, and a general index, this classic is now back in print for the first time in decades. Harper's knowledge of natural history transforms Bartram's accounts of the southern states from a curious record of personal observation from the past into a guidebook useful to modern biologists, historians, ornithologists, and ethnologists.

In 1773 the naturalist and writer William Bartram set out from Philadelphia on a four-year journey ranging from the Carolinas to Florida and Mississippi. For Bartram it was the perfect opportunity to pursue his interest in observing and drawing plants and birds. Combining precise and detailed scientific observations with a profound appreciation of nature, he produced a written account of his journey that would later influence both scientists and poets, including Wordsworth and Coleridge.

Bartram was among the first to integrate scientific observations and personal commentary. Unlike most of his contemporaries, he condemned the idea that nature was simply a resource to be consumed. Instead, he championed the aesthetic and scientific values of an "infinite variety of animated scenes, inexpressibly beautiful and pleasing." From his field journals he prepared a report for his benefactor and a larger report for the public. The former was rediscovered much later and published in 1943; the latter was published in 1791 and became the basis for the modern Bartram's Travels.

  

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Pages 469-470 are missing.

Contents

iv PART II
li
Part One
7
Part Two
37
in 4146
41
through and describes the sound c leaves Amelia island and arrives
48
63
63
at Mount Royaldescribes the mount Indian highway c beautiful
71
108
108
vi 237 251
237
colacordially received by governor Chestersome account of
265
278
278
for the Creek nationhis horse tiresis in great distressmeets
294
297
297
PART IV
306
Part Four
307
313
313

crosses the mountainstheir situation views and productionsrests
141
159
159
Warriorludicrous Indian farce relative to a rattle snakewar farce
179
vii chap xi 192
192
Part Three
195
fine cultivated countrycrosses Savannariver and enters the state
199
viii CHAP IV 227
227
in dignity and power is the great war chiefentirely independent
316
xi chap iv 325
325
References literature
668
Maps and Atlases Cited
690
General Index
703
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

William Bartram (1739-1823) is renowned as one of the first early American naturalists. Francis Harper (1886-1972) was a noted field biologist and the author of many books, including Okefinokee Album (Georgia).

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