Roots of Tradition: Amphibious Warfare in the Early American Republic

Front Cover
ProQuest, 2008 - 372 pages
0 Reviews
The second chapter, entitled The New York Campaign, addresses the largest amphibious undertaking of the eighteenth century. This study takes an objective view of the campaign and its battles and finds that, although the New York Campaign constituted a defeat for American forces, it was not the unmitigated disaster often pictured. The third chapter addresses the Yorktown campaign, which was the most complex operation of the American Revolution. It involved both joint and combined actions with diverse forces coming together from three widely disbursed points in North America and the West Indies. The Yorktown campaign demonstrated the awesome power of navies and land forces working together on the world's littorals. Yorktown was all the more remarkable because of the primitive communications available to leaders of that era.
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

CHAPTERS INTRODUCTION
1
NOTES ON SOURCES AND CONCEPTS
20
REFERENCE
28
THE NEW YORK CAMPAIGN
45
THE YORKTOWN CAMPAIGN
91
THE ACTION AT DERNA TRIPOLI
137
THE DEFENSE OF BALITMORE
181
THE CONQUEST OF CALIFORNIA
233
THE LANDING AT VERACRUZ
269
THE FORT FISHER CAMPAIGN
300
Copyright

Common terms and phrases

Bibliographic information