The American Common-school Reader and Speaker: Being a Selection of Pieces in Prose and Verse, with Rules for Reading and Speaking (Google eBook)

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C. Tappan, 1844 - Elocution - 428 pages
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Contents

38T That Silent Moon G W Do A it a
129
Evenin? on the St Lawrence Prof Silliman
130
America to England W Allston
131
The American Eagle C W Thomson
133
The Last Evening before Eternity J A Hillhodsb
135
Character of Jesus S C Thacher
136
Woman Miss C E Beecher
138
The Treadmill Song O W Holmes
140
Darkness Byron
141
God Derzkavin
143
w Niagara Mrs Sigourney
146
The United Stales G Bancroft
147
Wouter Van Twiller Washington Irving
149
invocation of Mirth Milton
151
Marco Bozzaris F G Hallrck
152
Waterloo Btron
154
Prussian Battle Hymn Korner
156
Bernardo del Carpio Mrs Unmans
158
William Kieft Washington Irving
160
Palmyra William Ware
161
Beauties of Nature Samuel G Howe
162
An Interesting Adventure William J Snelling
163
Thoughts on Politeness Geo S Hillard
166
Same Subject concluded Id
167
Cottage on the Swiss Alps Buck minster
169
Ode on Art Charles Sprague
171
Robert Bums F G Halleck
172
The Future Life W C Bryant
174
The Spirit of Poetry H W Longfellow
175
The Soldiers Widow N P Willis
176
The Sicilian Vespers J G Whittier
177
Mexican Mythology Wm H Prescott
178
Origin and Progress of Language Samuel G Howe
180
Zenobias Ambition William Ware
181
Trials of the Post and the Scholar Geo S Hillard
183
The Yankees Samuel Kettel
184
Custom of Whitewashing Francis Hopkinson
185
Same Subject continued Id
187
Same Subject concluded Id
188
The Force of Curiosity Charles Spraoue
191
The Winds W C Bryant
193
Daybreak Richard H Dana Sen
194
The Light of Home Mrs S J Hale
196
A Psalm of Life H W IOngfellow
197
To the Condor E F Ellet
198
A Child carried away by an Eagle Professor Wilson
199
Same Subject concluded Id
201
Scene at the Dedication of a Heathen Temple William Ware
204
Same Subject continued Id
205
Same Subject concluded Id
206
Hamilton and Jay Dr Hawks
207
Adams and Jefferson Daniel Weester
209
The Destiny of our Republic G S Hillard
211
Posthumous Influence of the Wise and Good Andrews Norton
212
Look Aloft J Lawrence Jr
213
Ode on War Wm H Burleigh
214
The Laal Days of Autumn Henry Pickering
215
Man N Y Evening Post
216
Passage down the Ohio H James K Paulding
217
Spirit of Beauty Rufus Dawes
218
Education of Females Joseph Story
219
The Voices of the Dead Orville Dewey
221
Incitements to American Intellect G S Hillard
222
Importance of Knowledge to the Mechanic G B Emerson
224
Macer preaching on the steps of the Capitol at Rome William Ware
226
Death a sublime and universal Moralist Jared Sparks
228
i in Morals Dr Beecher
229
The Stage Charlrs Spraode
237
The BurialPlace at Laurel Hill W G Cueit
238
11 The Good Wife Georoe W Buenap
239
A Good Daughter J Palpret 210
240
Religioo the Guardian of the Soul Orville IJrwey 2 1
242
Study of Human Nature essential to a Teacher G B Emerson
243
Education _ P Humphrey MS 119 Progress of Science Edward Everett 216
246
Purpose of the BunkerHill Monument Daniel Weester
247
The American Flag Deaee
248
Greece in 1320 J G Beooxe 2 0
252
The Cure of Melancholy Carlos Wilcox
253
My Native Village John H Bryant 2
254
The Press Joseph T Buckingham
255
6
256
Trying to Pleaso Edwardi r Giianninq 2o7 129 Defence of Charles GreenJeaf HUABD Jg 130 The Genius of Aristophanes tC CAFeITON t? 131 Resp...
261
The MockingBird Alexander Wilson
262
The Representative Jn0
275
A Republican SchoolRoom A SS1 S oin 144 The English Skylark Sam el H Stearns 230
282
New England Freedom and Enterprise J0A BJDINCY Jji 147 Freedom and Progress Charles G Atherton 235
285
Scene from Marino Faliero Hyron 237
287
Toe Rich Mans Son and the Poor Mans Son J R Lowell
290
New Englands Dead Isaac MLellan Jr
291
The Graves of the Patriots Ja Pcival
293
Truth H W Longpellow
294
The First Settlers In Now Hampshire tNJ AJS11 2X5 154 Scrooge and Marley Charles Dickens
298
The Pilgrim Fathers of New England Rums Choate 30O 156 The Settlers of Connecticut Chan Kent
302
Benefits of Colledate Education John Sergeant
303
Our Control over our Physical Wellbeing Horace Mann
306
The Insolvent and the Bankrupt J M Berrien
307
Extract from an Address delivered at Chapel Hill William Gaston
311
The Lyre Milton Ward
312
Polish War Song James G Percival
314
Bclshazzar a Crolu
315
Dame Natures Charms Wm C Lodoe
316
Night in Eden Mrs E H Evans
318
The Present Age Daniel Weester
319
Melancholy Fate of the Indians Joseph Story
320
Edmund Burke A H Everett
322
National Self Respect Beman
323
Internal Improvement J C Calhoun
325
Founders of our Government Wm M Richardson
326
Conduct of the Opposition Henry Clay
327
God the Creator Fenelan
328
Crescentius Mia Landon
329
Address to I l o Ocean Barry Cornwall
330
The Urea Major Henry Warh Jr
331
17E The Fate of tyranny Mason
335
The Downfall of Poland Thomas Campbell
338
Napoleon at Rest John Pierpont
339
Napoleon Bonaparte Channing
340
The Thunder Storm Washington Irving
342
Classical Learning Joseph Story
343
The BunkerHill Monument Daniel Weester
345
Appeal in Favor of the Union James Madison
346
France and Eneland John C Calhoun
348
Military Insubordination Henry Clay
350
Loss of National Character President Maxcy
351
Lafayette and Napoleon E Everett
352
The Vision ofLibeny Henry Ware Jr
354
Shakspeare Charles Sprague
356
Speech of Kienzi to the Romans Mm Mitford
357
Same Subject Tlwmm Moore
359
Gustavus Vasa to the Swedes Brooke
360
A Field of Battle Shelley
361
Resistance to Oppression Patrick Henry
362
Duties of American Citizens Levi Woodeury
364
Political Corruption Geo MDuffie
366
Intelligence necessary to perpetuate Independence Judoe Dawes
367
South American Republics Daniel Weester
368
Excellence of the Holy Scriptures Beatttt
370
Sir Anthony Absolute and Captain Absolute Shertdan
372
Antonys Address to the Roman Populace Shakspeare
375
The Victor Angels MUtan
377
Impressment of American Seamen Henry Clay
378
New England what is sho 1 Tristam Buroes
379
Parly Spirit William Gaston
381
Restless Spirit of Man Wileur Fisk 333
385
Washington Daniel Weester
386
Public Faith Fisher Ames 338
388
Free Institutions favorable to Literature Edward Everett
390
The Study of Elocution necessary for a Preacher Prof Park
391
2TB Relief of Revolutionary Officers Martin Van Buren
393
Rapacity and Barbarity of a British Soldiery Wm Livingston
394
Free Navigation of the Mississippi Gooverneor Morris
395
Our Duties to our Country Daniel Weester
397
England and the United Slates E Everett
399
Massachusetts and New York Gov Seward
402
The Bible Thos S Grimke
405
Scenery about Hassen Cleaver Hills John A Clark
407
The Treasure that Waxeth not Old D Huntington
409
The Young Mariners Dream Dinumd
410
Gustavus Vasa and Crisliern Brooke
411
Tamerlane and Bajozet Rotce
414
An Independent Judiciary James A Bayard
417
Memorials of Washington and Franklin J Q Adams
419
Dialogue from Henry IV Shakspeare
421
IBI The Love of Tmlh George Putnam
424
Energy of the Will Thomas C Upham
425
The Scholar la Mission George Putnam
427

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 363 - Besides, sir, we shall not fight our battles alone. There is a just God, who presides over the destinies of nations, and who will raise up friends to fight our battles for us. The battle, sir, is not to the strong alone; it is to the vigilant, the active, the brave.
Page 39 - Sleeping within mine orchard, My custom always of the afternoon, Upon my secure hour thy uncle stole, With juice of cursed hebenon in a vial, And in the porches of mine ears did pour The leperous distilment; whose effect Holds such an enmity with blood of man, That, swift as quicksilver, it courses through The natural gates and alleys of the body ; And, with a sudden vigour, it doth posset And curd, like eager droppings into milk, The thin and wholesome blood...
Page 76 - And I said, Who art thou, Lord? And he said, I am Jesus whom thou persecutest. But rise, and stand upon thy feet: for I have appeared unto thee for this purpose, to make thee a minister and a witness both of these things which thou hast seen, and of those things in the which I will appear unto thee...
Page 16 - No sooner had the Almighty ceased, but all The multitude of angels, with a shout Loud as from numbers without number, sweet As from blest voices, uttering joy...
Page 153 - AT midnight, in his guarded tent, The Turk was dreaming of the hour When Greece, her knee in suppliance bent, Should tremble at his power ; In dreams, through camp and court, he bore The trophies of a conqueror ; In dreams his song of triumph heard. Then wore his monarch's signet ring, Then pressed that monarch's throne a King ; As wild his thoughts, and gay of wing, As Eden's garden bird.
Page 291 - Mr. President, I shall enter on no encomium upon Massachusetts she needs none. There she is behold her, and judge for yourselves. There is her history the world knows it by heart. The past, at least, is secure. There is Boston, and Concord, and Lexington, and Bunker Hill ; and there they will remain forever.
Page 363 - If we wish to be free if we mean to preserve inviolate those inestimable privileges for which we have been so long contending if we mean not basely to abandon the noble struggle in which we have been so long engaged, and which we have pledged ourselves never to abandon, until the glorious object of our contest shall be obtained we must fight! I repeat it, sir, we must fight! An appeal to arms and to the God of Hosts is all that is left us! They tell us, sir, that we are weak; unable to...
Page 363 - They tell us, sir, that we are weak unable to cope with so formidable an adversary. But when shall we be stronger? Will it be the next week, or the next year?
Page 375 - I speak not to disprove what Brutus spoke, But here I am to speak what I do know. You all did love him once, not without cause; What cause withholds you then to mourn for him ? O judgment, thou art fled to brutish beasts, And men have lost their reason!
Page 362 - No, sir, she has none. They are meant for us ; they can be meant for no other. They are sent over to bind and rivet upon us those chains which the British ministry have been so long forging.

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