Our National Bane; Or, The Dry-rot in American Politics: A Tract for the Times Touching Civil Service Reform (Google eBook)

Front Cover
A. D. F. Randolph, 1877 - Civil service reform - 118 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 61 - There is an opinion, that parties in free countries are useful checks upon the administration of the Government, and serve to keep alive the spirit of Liberty.
Page 61 - Without looking forward to an extremity of this kind (which, nevertheless, ought not to be entirely out of sight), the common and continual mischiefs of the spirit of party are sufficient to make it the interest and duty of a wise people to discourage and restrain it. It serves always to distract the public councils, and enfeeble the public administration. It agitates the community with ill-founded jealousies and false alarms ; kindles the animosity of one part against another ; foments, occasionally,...
Page 61 - Patriotism may look with indulgence, if not with favor, upon the spirit of party. But in those of the popular character, in Governments purely elective, it is a spirit not to be encouraged. From their natural tendency, it is certain there will always be enough of that spirit for every salutary purpose. And, there being constant danger of excess, the effort ought to be, by force of public opinion, to mitigate and assuage it. A fire not to be quenched, it demands a uniform vigilance to prevent its...
Page 71 - A servant with this clause makes drudgery divine; who sweeps a room, as for thy laws, makes that and the action fine.
Page 93 - President is authorized to prescribe such regulations for the admission of persons into the civil service of the United States as may best promote the efficiency thereof...
Page 5 - A change of the Chief Magistrate, therefore, would not occasion so violent or so general a revolution in the officers of the Government as might be expected if he were the sole disposer of offices. Where a man in any station had given satisfactory evidence of his fitness for it, a new President would be restrained from attempting a change in favor of a person more agreeable to him by the apprehension that a discountenance of the Senate might frustrate the attempt and bring some degree of discredit...
Page 67 - Surely thou wilt slay the wicked, O God: depart from me therefore, ye bloody men. 20 For they speak against thee wickedly, and thine enemies take thy name in vain. 21 Do not I hate them, O LORD, that hate thee? And am not I grieved with those that rise up against thee? 22 I hate them with perfect hatred: I count them mine enemies.
Page 118 - When the people have emptied themselves of all the lust of selfish will, which without religion it is utterly impossible they ever should, when they are conscious that they exercise, and exercise perhaps in a higher link of the order of delegation, the power, which to be legitimate must be according to that eternal, immutable law, in whkh will and reason are the same, they will be more careful how they place power in base and incapable hands.
Page 35 - President, either directly or through the heads of departments, made all the appointments. But gradually the appointing power, in many cases, passed into the control of members of congress. The offices in these cases have become not merely rewards for party services, but rewards for services to party leaders. This system destroys the independence of the separate departments of the government. It tends directly to extravagance and official incapacity...
Page 78 - But when we in our viciousness grow hard, (O misery on't !) the wise gods seel our eyes In our own filth; drop our clear judgments; make us Adore our errors ; laugh at us while we strut To our confusion.

Bibliographic information