Franz Schubert, a musical biography, from the Germ. [abridged] by E. Wilberforce (Google eBook)

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Page 143 - There, far up among its limestone crags, in a spot scarcely accessible to human foot, the peasants of the valley point out to the traveller the black mouth of a cavern, and tell him that within Barbarossa lies amid his knights in an enchanted sleep, waiting the hour when the ravens shall cease to hover round the peak, and the pear-tree [shall] blossom in the valley, to descend with his Crusaders and bring back to Germany the golden age of peace and strength and unity.
Page 49 - Io qui Sottoscritto affermo, quanto nella supplica di Francesco Schubert in riguardo al posto musicale di Lubiana sta esposto.
Page 5 - I sent him to attend the singingclass of Herr Michael Holzer, choirmaster in Lichtenthal. Herr Holzer often assured me, with tears in his eyes, that he had never had such a pupil ' Whenever I want to teach him anything new,' he would say,
Page 132 - For him alone look I Out at the window ! For him alone go I Out of the house...
Page 289 - Second Edition. Post 8vo. 6s. " A very able volume. Mr. Wilberforce is a very pleasant and agreeable writer whose opinion is worth hearing on the subject of modern art which enters largely into the matter of his discourse.
Page 153 - Hunc, qualem nequeo monstrare, et sentio tantum, Anxietate carens animus facit, omnis acerbi Impatiens, cupidus silvarum, aptusque bibendis Fontibus Aonidum. Neque enim cantare sub antro Pierio, thyrsumve potest contingere sana Paupertas, atque aeris inops, quo nocte dieque Corpus eget : satur est, quum dicit Horatius...
Page 132 - Picture to yourself a man whose health can never be re-established, who from sheer despair makes matters worse instead of better ; picture to yourself, I say, a man whose most brilliant hopes have come to nothing, to whom the happiness of proffered love and friendship is but anguish, whose enthusiasm for the beautiful (an inspired feeling at least) threatens to vanish altogether, and then ask yourself if such a condition does not represent a miserable and unhappy man...
Page 45 - ... a whole string of general remarks which have nothing to do with one another, and tell nothing of his life except in so far as they illustrate the state of his mind. Such as, " Natural disposition and education determine the bent of man's heart and understanding. The heart is ruler ; the mind should be. Take men as they are, not as they ought to be. Town politeness is a powerful hindrance to men's integrity in dealing with one another," and so on, whole pages in a single day.
Page 132 - Schubert suffered from the exhaustion and relapse which is the torment of all highly sensitive and imaginative temperaments. But his troubles after all were far from imaginary. Step by step life was turning out for him a detailed and irremediable failure.
Page 66 - La traduction francaise ne nous donne qu'une idee tres-imparfaite de ce qu'est 1'union de ces poesies presque toutes extremement belles avec la musique de Schubert, le musicien le plus poete qui fut jamais.

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