The Flight of the Shadow

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1st World Publishing, 2005 - Fiction - 264 pages
4 Reviews
Purchase one of 1st World Library's Classic Books and help support our free internet library of downloadable eBooks. Visit us online at www.1stWorldLibrary.ORG - - I am old, else, I think, I should not have the courage to tell the story I am going to tell. All those concerned in it about whose feelings I am careful, are gone where, thank God, there are no secrets! If they know what I am doing, I know they do not mind. If they were alive to read as I record, they might perhaps now and again look a little paler and wish the leaf turned, but to see the things set down would not make them unhappy: they do not love secrecy. Half the misery in the world comes from trying to look, instead of trying to be, what one is not. I would that not God only but all good men and women might see me through and through. They would not be pleased with everything they saw, but then neither am I, and I would have no coals of fire in my soul's pockets! But my very nature would shudder at the thought of letting one person that loved a secret see into it. Such a one never sees things as they are - would not indeed see what was there, but something shaped and coloured after his own likeness. No one who loves and chooses a secret can be of the pure in heart that shall see God.
  

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Review: The Flight of the Shadow

User Review  - Ashley Person - Goodreads

This is the first George MacDonald book I've read. It's an okay example of Victorian melodrama. I thought it might be a fantasy novel, given his works, but it's a pretty normal book and I honestly ... Read full review

Review: The Flight of the Shadow

User Review  - Kimberly Barlow Cook - Goodreads

I started reading from the collection of works by George MacDonald because I understood he was an inspiration to one of my favorite authors, CS Lewis. I randomly picked this short novel and was not ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

MRS DAY BEGINS THE STORY
9
MISS MARTHA MOON
12
MY UNCLE
18
MY UNCLES ROOM AND MY UNCLE IN IT
23
MY FIRST SECRET
31
I LOSE MYSELF
42
THE MIRROR
48
THANATOS AND ZOE
54
A STRANGE VISIT
130
A FOILED ATTEMPT
136
JOHN RECALLS AND REMEMBERS
142
LETTER AND ANSWER
150
HAND TO HAND
155
A VERY STRANGE THING
164
THE EVIL DRAWS NIGHER
172
AN ENCOUNTER
183

THE GARDEN
64
ONCE MORE A SECRET
70
THE MOLE BURROWS
75
A LETTER
79
OLD LOVE AND NEW
86
MOTHER AND UNCLE
93
THE TIME BETWEEN
104
XVI FAULT AND NO FAULT
107
THE SUMMONS
114
JOHN SEES SOMETHING
124
JOHN IS TAKEN ILL
127
ANOTHER VISION
192
MOTHER AND SON
197
ONCE MORE AND YET AGAIN
203
MY UNCLE COMES HOME
211
TWICE TWO IS ONE
218
HALF ONE IS ONE
222
THE STORY OF MY TWIN UNCLES
228
UNCLE EDMUNDS APPENDIX
253
THE END OF THE FIRST VOLUME
259
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

George MacDonald, December 10, 1824 - September 18. 1905 George MacDonald was born on December 10, 1824 in Huntley, Aberdeenshire, Scotland. He attended University in Aberdeen in 1840 and then went on to Highbury College in 1848 where he studied to be a Congregational Minister, receiving his M. A. His first appointment was in Arundel, but he was forced to resign form the position in 1853. He became a lecturer in English Literature at Kings College in London before finally focusing all of his attention on writing and living off the charity of friends and pupils. In 1955, MacDonald wrote his first important original work, a long religious poem entitled "Within and Without." Three years later in 1858, he wrote "Phantastes," his first contribution to the fantasy genre. It was influenced by both the English and Germanic Romantic writers and religious poets of the Renaissance. MacDonald is perhaps best known for his fantasy children's books, although he wrote fantasy books for adults as well. His most well known children's book is "At the Back of the North Wind," which was surprisingly a favorite of Mark Twain's children. In 1863, MacDonald published "David Eiginbrod, the first of a dozen novels that were set in Scotland and based on the lives of rural Scots. It was these series of novels that gained MacDonald worldwide fame and brought money to the foundering MacDonald family. MacDonald was a friend and confident of Lewis Carroll and John Ruskin. He exchanged letters with Mark Twain, and met Walt Whitman and many other American writers on his trips to America. MacDonald also inspired his later compatriots, such as C. S. Lewis, with his blend of fantasy and Christianity. George MacDonald died in Ashtead, Surrey, England, on September 18. 1905. His body is buried in Bordighea, Italy, a place he spent most of his later years in.

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