The Cornwall Register: Containing Collections Relative to the Past and Present State of the 209 Parishes, Forming the County, Archdeaconry, Parliamentary Divisions, and Poor Law Unions of Cornwall ; to which is Added a Brief View of the Adjoining Towns and Parishes in Devon, from Hartland to Plymouth (Google eBook)

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Liddell and Son, 1847 - Parishes - 476 pages
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Page 359 - But has heard of the Well of St. Keyne. An oak and an elm tree stand beside, And behind does an ash tree grow, And a willow from the bank above Droops to the water below. A traveller came to the Well of St. Keyne...
Page 382 - A little lowly hermitage it was, Down in a dale, hard by a forest's side, Far from resort of people, that did pass In travel to and fro : a little wide There was...
Page 154 - Kings do more easily find instruments for their will and humour than for their service and honour, he had gotten for his purpose, or beyond his purpose, two instruments, Empson and Dudley; whom the people esteemed as his horse-leeches and shearers : bold men and careless of fame, and that took toll of their master's grist.
Page 321 - ... somewhat. But to destroy all without consideration, is and will be unto England for ever, a most horrible infamy among the grave seniors of other nations.
Page 112 - A Survey of the Cities of London and Westminster and the Borough of Southwark...
Page 146 - These three years,' (answered the servant.) Then the Provost commanded his men to lay hold on him, and hang him on the next tree. At this the fellow cried out that he was not the miller, but the miller's man.
Page 390 - ... of all human probability, and all imaginable disadvantages ; that as we cannot be forgetful of so great desert, so we cannot but desire to publish it to all the world, and perpetuate to all time the memory of their merits, and of our acceptance of the same, and to that end we do hereby render...
Page 390 - ... when we could contribute so little to our own defence, or to their assistance ; in a time when not only no reward appeared, but great and probable dangers were threatened to obedience and loyalty ; of their great and eminent courage and patience in their indefatigable prosecution of their great work against so potent an enemy, backed with so strong, rich, and populous cities, and so plentifully furnished and supplied with men, arms, money, ammunition, and...
Page 390 - ... and to that end we do hereby render our royal thanks to that our County in the most public and lasting manner we can devise, commanding copies hereof to be printed and published, and one of them to be read in every church and chapel therein, and to be kept for ever as a record in the same; that as long as the history of these times and of this nation shall continue, the memory of how much that County hath merited from us and our crown, may be derived with it to posterity. Given at our camp at...
Page 321 - Never had we been offended for the loss of our libraries, being so many in number, and in so desolate places for the more part, if the chief monuments and most notable works of our excellent writers, had been reserved. If there had been in every shire of England, but one solemn library, to the preservation of those noble works, and preferment of good learnings in our posterity, it had been yet somewhat.

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