The Quintessence of English Poetry, Or, a Collection of All the Beautiful Passages in Our Poems and Plays, from the Celebrated Spencer to 1688 ... (Google eBook)

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Olive Payne, 1740 - English poetry
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Page 309 - And new philosophy calls all in doubt; The element of fire is quite put out; The sun is lost, and th' earth, and no man's wit Can well direct him where to look for it.
Page 199 - Though I look old, yet I am strong and lusty: For in my youth I never did apply Hot and rebellious liquors in my blood; Nor did not with unbashful forehead woo The means of weakness and debility; Therefore my age is as a lusty winter, Frosty, but kindly: let me go with you; I'll do the service of a younger man In all your business and necessities.
Page 22 - Speak the speech, I pray you, as I pronounced it to you, trippingly on the tongue : but if you mouth it, as many of our players do, I had as lief the town-crier spoke my lines.
Page 88 - I know you all, and will awhile uphold The unyok'd humour of your idleness ; Yet herein will I imitate the sun, Who doth permit the base contagious clouds To smother up his beauty from the world, That when he please again to be himself, Being wanted, he may be more wonder'd at, By breaking through the foul and ugly mists Of vapours that did seem to strangle him.
Page 19 - Perseverance, dear my lord, Keeps honour bright : To have done, is to hang Quite out of fashion, like a rusty mail In monumental mockery.
Page 43 - Even to the teeth and forehead of our faults To give in evidence. What then? what rests? Try what repentance can: what can it not? Yet what can it, when one can not repent? O wretched state! O bosom black as death! O limed soul, that struggling to be free Art more engaged! Help, angels! make assay; Bow, stubborn knees; and heart with strings of steel Be soft as sinews of the new-born babe. All may be well.
Page 104 - Mongst quiet kindred that had nothing left By their dead parents : ' Stay,' quoth Reputation, ' Do not forsake me ; for it is my nature, If once I part from any man I meet, I am never found again.
Page 114 - Now might I do it, pat, now he is praying; And now I'll do't...
Page 21 - What's Hecuba to him, or he to Hecuba, That he should weep for her/ What would he do, Had he the motive and the cue for passion That I have...
Page 105 - A real, or at least, a seeming good. Who fears not to do ill, yet fears the name, And, free from conscience, is a slave to fame. Thus he the church at once protects and spoils ; But princes' swords are sharper than their styles : And thus to th' ages past he makes amends, Their charity destroys, their faith defends.

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