The Natural History of the Musical Bow: A Chapter in the Developmental History of Stringed Instruments of Music. Primitive Types (Google eBook)

Front Cover
At the Clarendon Press, 1899 - Stringed instruments, Bowed - 87 pages
0 Reviews
  

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 58 - A series of bells of various sizes is fastened to the frame of a gigantic bow ; the strings are tightened so as to emit a musical note when struck ; and the bow rests on a large empty brazen pot. The instrument is played on by a plectrum, and several musicians join in the performance. One strikes the string of the bow with the plectrum, another produces the bass by striking the brazen pot with his hand, and the third keeps time, and improves the harmony, by a pair of cymbals.* As each musician kindles...
Page 12 - ... with the other. Performers may often be seen sitting for an hour together with an instrument of this sort : they stick one end of the bow into the ground, and fasten the string over a cavity covered with bark, which opens into an aperture for the escape of the sound. They pass one hand from one part of the bow to the other, and with the other they play upon the string with the bamboo twig, and produce a considerable variety of buzzing and humming airs which are really rather pretty. This is quite...
Page 20 - A musical instrument sometimes seen is made by stretching a thin string to a bent bow, about three feet long, passed through half a gouard, the open end of which rests against the performer's bare stomach. The string is struck with a thin slip of cane or palm-leaf stem held in the right hand, and a finger of the left, which holds the instrument, is laid occasionally on the string, and in this way, with occasional gentle blows of the open gourd against the stomach, very pleasing sounds and modulations...
Page 43 - This instrument, called hool, is made by stretching a piece of rope-like vine, called ohil, between the two ends of a pliable piece of wood, making a bow about two feet in length. One end of this bow is placed near the face, about one-third of the distance from the end, so that the mouth covers but does not touch the string, forming a resonator. Between the string and the bow a piece of wood is placed in such a manner that it may be pressed against the string or relaxed at will. The tones are produced...
Page 42 - ... gourd or jar, which serves as a resonator. The bow is usually a hollow reed about 5 feet long, and the resonator is attached at one-third the distance from one end. The string is then bent down and fastened to the mouth of the jar. The notes are produced by striking the two sections of the string with a light stick, and at the same time the opening of the jar is more or less closed by the palm of the hand, thus producing a variety in the notes. His fourth is a specimen from the Metropolitan Museum,...
Page iii - Balfour . The Natural History of the Musical Bow. A Chapter in the Developmental History of Stringed Instruments of Music. Part I, Primitive Types. By Henry Balfour, MA Royal 8vo, paper covers. 4*.
Page 5 - Their only musical instrument is their bow. They tie a piece of reim round the bow-string and the handle and bind them up tight together; then they hold the bow horizontally against their teeth, and strike the tense bow-string with a small stick. A good performer can produce great effect with it. They attend more to the rhythm than the notes, and imitate with its music the galloping or trotting of different animals to perfection.
Page 75 - ... islands they fashion them of bamboo, as in the New Hebrides and New Guinea;1 but I did not observe any nativemade instruments amongst the people of Bougainville Straits. The women of Treasury Island produce a similar though softer kind of music by playing, somewhat after the fashion of a Jew's harp, on a lightly made fine-stringed bow about 15 inches long. This is held to the lips and the string is gently struck with the fingers, the cavity of the mouth serving as a resonator. . . . That school-boy's...
Page 44 - ... between the two ends of a pliable piece of wood, making a bow about two feet in length. One end of this bow is placed near the face, about one-third of the distance from the end, so that the mouth covers but does not touch the string, forming a resonator. Between the string and the bow a piece of wood is placed in such a manner that it may be pressed against the string or relaxed at will. The tones are produced by tapping on the string, thus producing a sound somewhat resembling that made in...
Page 45 - G, the last of the row, which most concerns us, represents a seated person witli a bpw held by the left hand, the string being pressed against the arm near the elbow, while in the left hand is held a forked stick, undoubtedly for use in twanging the tightened cord of the bow. These six musicians all face the same way, to the left, as is the case with the heads in the Mayan hieroglyphs. This ensemble of musicians, in which the bow has a place, seems to be sufficient proof of the existence of the musical...

Bibliographic information