The Life and Work of George Sylvester Morris: A Chapter in the History of American Thought in the Nineteenth Century (Google eBook)

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Macmillan, 1917 - MORRIS, GEORGE SYLVESTER,1840-1889 - 332 pages
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Page 158 - But for those first affections, Those shadowy recollections, Which, be they what they may, Are yet the fountain light of all our day, Are yet a master light of all our seeing; Uphold us, cherish, and have power to make Our noisy years seem moments in the being Of the eternal Silence...
Page 227 - I dine, I play a game of backgammon, I converse, and am merry with my friends ; and when, after three or four hours...
Page 87 - For while the tired waves, vainly breaking, Seem here no painful inch to gain, Far back, through creeks and inlets making, Comes silent, flooding in, the main. And not by eastern windows only, When daylight comes, comes in the light; In front, the sun climbs slow, how slowly, But westward, look, the land is bright.
Page 334 - VOL. VII. ATHENIAN LEKYTHOI WITH OUTLINE DRAWING IN MATT COLOR ON A WHITE GROUND, AND AN APPENDIX : ADDITIONAL LEKYTHOI WITH OUTLINE DRAWING IN GLAZE VARNISH ON A WHITE GROUND.
Page 335 - Part II. THE PRODROMUS OF NICOLAUS STENO'S LATIN DISSERTATION ON A SOLID BODY ENCLOSED BY PROCESS OF NATURE WITHIN A SOLID. Translated into English by Professor John G. Winter, University of Michigan, with a Foreword by Professor William H. Hobbs. With 7 plates. Pp. 165-283. Paper covers. $1.30. Part III. VESUVIUS IN ANTIQUITY.
Page 16 - A sect, whose chief devotion lies In odd perverse antipathies ; In falling out with that or this, And finding somewhat still amiss ; More peevish, cross, and splenetic, Than dog distract or monkey sick...
Page 68 - Tis the day of the chattel, Web to weave, and corn to grind; Things are in the saddle, And ride mankind. There are two laws discrete, Not reconciled, Law for man, and law for thing; The last builds town and fleet, But it runs wild, And doth the man unking.
Page 230 - First. To investigate fully and impartially the most important questions of Philosophy and Science, but more especially those that bear upon the great truths revealed in Holy Scripture, with the view of reconciling any apparent discrepancies between Christianity and Science.
Page 19 - The end of all good government is to cultivate humanity and promote the happiness of all, and the good of every man in all his rights, his life, liberty, estate, honor, etc., without injury or abuse done to any.
Page 32 - But now I only hear Its melancholy, long, withdrawing roar, Retreating, to the breath Of the night wind, down the vast edges drear And naked shingles of the world.

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