Revolution in Time: Clocks and the Making of the Modern World

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“The” Belknap Press of Havard University Press, 1983 - Science - 482 pages
3 Reviews
More than a decade after the publication of his dazzling book on the cultural, technological, and manufacturing aspects of measuring time and making clocks, David Landes has significantly expanded "Revolution in Time." In a new preface and scores of updated passages, he explores new findings about medieval and early-modern time keeping, as well as contemporary hi-tech uses of the watch as mini-computer, cellular phone, and even radio receiver or television screen. While commenting on the latest research, Landes never loses his focus on the historical meaning of time and its many perceptions and uses, questions that go beyond history, that involve philosophers and possibly, theologians and literary folk as well.

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Review: Revolution in Time: Clocks and the Making of the Modern World

User Review  - Kevin - Goodreads

One of the definitive works on the history of time keeping. It is full of useful detail, yet also provides a big picture of the developments of horology. The one danger of the book is that it can ... Read full review

Review: Revolution in Time: Clocks and the Making of the Modern World

User Review  - Steve Dock - Goodreads

The first chapters give a masterful view of how mankind's relationship to and conception of TIME evolved and suddenly changed with the development of clocks. The remainder of the book is a technical tour-de-force on clockmaking. Read full review

Contents

Introduction
1
FINDING TIME
15
Why Are the Memorials Late?
37
Copyright

25 other sections not shown

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About the author (1983)

David Landes is Emeritus Professor of Economics and History at Harvard University and the author of The Wealth and Poverty of Nations (1998).

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