Annals of the Liverpool Stage: From the Earliest Period to the Present Time, Together with Some Account of the Theatres and Music Halls in Bootle and Birkenhead (Google eBook)

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E. Howell, 1908 - Theater - 393 pages
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Page 79 - Nature had formed her in her most prodigal humour; and when nature is in the humour to make a woman all that is delightful, she does it most effectually.
Page 89 - ... said he, with the greatest expression in his honest, sunburnt countenance; 'I will go bail for you to any amount. And as for you (turning to the frightened actor), if you don't bear a hand, and shift your moorings, you lubber, it will be worse for you when I come athwart your bows.
Page 47 - Assembly ; be it therefore enacted by the authority aforesaid, that it shall and may be...
Page 336 - GUILD of LITERATURE and ART: to encourage life assurance and other provident habits among authors and artists ; to render such assistance to both as shall never compromise their independence ; and to found a new Institution where honourable rest from arduous labour shall still be associated with the discharge of congenial duties.
Page 196 - We command you, That within eight days after the service of this writ on you, inclusive of the day of such service, you do cause an appearance to be entered for you...
Page 88 - Yes, you shall have one friend at least, my poor young woman,' said he, with the greatest expression in his honest, sunburnt countenance ; ' I will go bail for you to any amount. And as for you,' turning to the frightened actor, ' if you don't bear a hand and shift your moorings, you lubber, it will be worse for you when I come athwart your bows!
Page 79 - Her face, her tones, her manner, were irresistible. Her smile had the effect of sunshine, and her laugh did one good to hear it. Her voice was eloquence itself. It seemed as if her heart was always at her mouth. She was all gaiety, openness and good nature. She rioted in her fine animal spirits, and gave more pleasure than any other actress, because she had the greatest spirit of enjoyment in herself.
Page 47 - An Act for reducing the Laws relating to Rogues. Vagabonds. Sturdy Beggars. and Vagrants into One Act of Parliament. and for the more effectual punishing such Rogues. Vagabonds. Sturdy Beggars. and Vagrants. and sending them whither they ought to be sent'.
Page 72 - After two or three fruitless entrances, and being saluted with volleys of potatoes and broken bottles, he thought proper to depute Siddons as his advocate, who entered bearing a board large enough to secure his person, inscribed with Mr. Younger's petition to be heard. The rogues would hear nothing, and Siddons may thank his wooden protector that his bones are whole.
Page 47 - An Act to explain and amend so much of an Act made in the Twelfth Year of the Reign of Queen Anne, intituled, An Act for reducing the Laws relating to Rogues, Vagabonds...

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