Beast and man: the roots of human nature

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Cornell University Press, 1978 - Philosophy - 377 pages
9 Reviews
Philosophers have traditionally concentrated on the qualities that make human beings different from other species. In Beast and Man Mary Midgley, one of our foremost intellectuals, stresses continuities. What makes people tick? Largely, she asserts, the same things as animals. She tells us humans are rather more like other animals than we previously allowed ourselves to believe, and reminds us just how primitive we are in comparison to the sophistication of many animals. A veritable classic for our age, Beast and Man has helped change the way we think about ourselves and the world in which we live.

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Review: Beast and Man: The Roots of Human Nature

User Review  - Orde - Goodreads

Great synthesis of moral philosophy with the insights into human nature without overstressing the latter while taking it seriously as the underlying motivational structure to which philosophy has to try to answere. Definitely recommendable and very readable. Read full review

Review: Beast and Man: The Roots of Human Nature

User Review  - Jace Davies - Goodreads

Very interesting ideas. Well put. Read full review

Contents

CONCEPTUAL PROBLEMS OF AN UNUSUAL SPECIES
1
Animals and the Problem of Evil
25
Instinct Nature and Purpose
51
Copyright

11 other sections not shown

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References to this book

The Ecological Self
Freya Mathews
No preview available - 1994
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About the author (1978)

Midgley, formerly Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of Newcastle, is a moral philosopher.

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