The Iliads of Homer, Prince of Poets: Never Before in Any Language Truly Translated, with a Comment Upon Some of His Chief Places, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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C. Knight, 1843 - Greek poetry
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Page 3 - OUT LOUD AND BOLD: THEN FELT I LIKE SOME WATCHER OF THE SKIES, WHEN A NEW PLANET SWIMS INTO HIS KEN; OR LIKE STOUT CORTEZ, WHEN WITH EAGLE EYES HE STARED AT THE PACIFIC—AND ALL HIS MEN LOOK*D AT EACH OTHER WITH A WILD SURMISE — SILENT, UPON A PEAK IN DARIEN.
Page 3 - MUCH HAVE I TRAVEL!/D IN THE REALMS OF GOLD, AND MANY GOODLY STATES AND KINGDOMS SEEN ; ROUND MANY WESTERN ISLANDS HAVE I BEEN, WHICH BARDS IN FEALTY TO APOLLO HOLD. OFT OF ONE WIDE EXPANSE HAD I BEEN TOLD, THAT
Page 25 - not abundantly shown himself to be one; for his Homer is not so properly a translation, as the stories of Achilles and Ulysses re-written. The earnestness and passion which he has put into every part of these poems would be incredible to a reader of more modern translations.
Page 25 - modern translations. His almost Greek zeal for the honour of his heroes is only paralleled by that fierce spirit of Hebrew bigotry with which Milton, as if personating one of the zealots of the old law, clothed himself when he sat down to paint the acts of Samson against the
Page 8 - passages which are less purely dramatic. Dramatic imitation was not his talent. He could not go out of himself, as Shakspere could shift at pleasure, to inform and animate other existences, but in himself he had an eye to perceive, and a soul to embrace, all forms.
Page 159 - when like the race of leaves The race of man is, that deserves no question : nor receives My being any other breath. The wind in autumn strows The earth with old leaves, then the spring the woods with new endows : And so death scatters men on earth : so life puts out again Man's leavy issue.
Page 23 - in poetry) is everywhere present, raising the low, dignifying the mean, and putting sense into the absurd. He makes his readers glow, weep, tremble, take any affection which he pleases, be moved by words, or in spite of them, be disgusted, and overcome that disgust.
Page 173 - divine. And such a stormy day shall come, (in mind and soul I know,) When sacred Troy shall shed her tow'rs, for tears of overthrow ; When Priam, all his birth and pow'r, shall in those tears be drown'd. But neither Troy's posterity, so much my soul doth wound
Page 39 - Take on you the charge And kingly government of this your land; Not as protector, steward, substitute. But as successively from blood to blood. Your right of birth, your empery, your own.
Page 17 - springs Stretch their long necks and clap their rustling wings; Now tower aloft and course in airy rounds, Now light with noise, with noise the field resounds. Thus numerous and confus'd, extending wide, The legions crowd Scamander's flowery side; With rushing troops the plains are cover'd o'er, And thundering footsteps shake the sounding shore. Along the river's level

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JSTOR: The Iliads of Homer, Prince of Poets
The Iliads of Homer, Prince of Poets. wl. The Classical Review, Vol. 7, No. 6, 279. Jun., 1893. The Iliads of Homer} Prince of Poets ; done into English by ...
links.jstor.org/ sici?sici=0009-840X(189306)1%3A7%3A6%3C279%3ATIOHPO%3E2.0.CO%3B2-2

vialibri - Rare Book Item Details
The Iliads of Homer, Prince of Poets. Neuer before in any languag... 1611 HOMER. The Iliads of Homer, Prince of Poets. Neuer before in any languag truely ...
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Reviews 1600-1699
The Iliads of Homer, prince of poets. At London, Printed for Nathaniell Butter. 1612 (1) Virgil (1612). Publii Virgilii Maronis opera. ...
www.auburn.edu/ ~downejm/ reviews/ 1600-1699.htm

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