The Personal Government of Charles I.: A History of England from the Assassination of the Duke of Buckingham to the Declaration of the Judges on Ship-money; 1628-1637, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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Longmans, Green, and Company, 1877 - Great Britain
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Page 322 - With antique pillars massy proof, And storied windows richly dight, Casting a dim religious light: There let the pealing organ blow, To the full-voiced choir below, In service high, and anthems clear, As may with sweetness through mine ear, Dissolve me into ecstasies, And bring all Heaven before mine eyes.
Page 321 - I was confirmed in this opinion that he who would not be frustrate of his hope to write well hereafter in laudable things, ought himself to be a true poem ; that is, a composition and pattern of the best and honourablest things ; not presuming to sing high praises of heroic men, or famous cities, unless he have in himself the experience and the practice of all that which is praiseworthy.
Page 320 - Touch their immortal harps of golden wires, With those just Spirits that wear victorious palms, Hymns devout and holy psalms Singing everlastingly; That we on Earth, with undiscording voice May rightly answer that melodious noise; As once we did, till disproportioned sin Jarred against nature's chime, and with harsh din Broke the fair music that all creatures made To their great Lord, whose love their motion swayed IOQ2 In perfect diapason, whilst they stood In first obedience, and their state of...
Page 67 - The church hath power to decree rites and ceremonies, and authority in controversies of faith...
Page 37 - And that no man hereafter shall either print, or preach, to draw the Article aside any way, but shall submit to it in the plain and full meaning thereof: and shall not put his own sense or comment to be the meaning of the Article, but shall take it in the literal and grammatical sense.
Page 316 - ... sacred name of priest contemptible, yet I will labour to make it honourable, by consecrating all my learning, and all my poor abilities, to advance the glory of that God that gave them ; knowing that I can never do too much for him that hath done so much for me as to make me a Christian. And I will labour to be like my Saviour, by making humility lovely in the eyes of all men, and by following the merciful and meek example of my dear Jesus.
Page 320 - In perfect diapason, whilst they stood In first obedience and their state of good. O may we soon again renew that song, And keep in tune with Heaven, till God ere long To His celestial consort us unite, To live with Him and sing in endless morn of light.
Page 44 - The King will follow Christ, and we the King In whom high God hath breathed a secret thing. Fall battleaxe, and flash brand ! Let the King reign.
Page 36 - Governor of the Church of England : And that if any difference arise about the external Policy, concerning the Injunctions, Canons, and other Constitutions whatsoever thereto belonging, the Clergy in their Convocation is to order and settle them, having first obtained leave under Our Broad Seal so to do : and We approving their said Ordinances and Constitutions; providing that none be made contrary to t he Laws and Customs of the Land.
Page 29 - And that the holy table in every church be decently made, and set in the place where the altar stood...

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