Speeches Delivered in the Congress of the United States: By Josiah Quincy, Member of the House of Representatives for the Suffolk District of Massachusetts, 1805-1813 (Google eBook)

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Little, Brown, and Company, 1874 - United States - 412 pages
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Page 317 - No sea but what is vexed by their fisheries. No climate that is not witness to their toils. Neither the perseverance of Holland, nor the activity of France, nor the dexterous and firm sagacity of English enterprise, ever carried this most perilous mode of hardy industry to the extent, to which it has been pushed by this recent people ; a people who are still, as it were, but in the gristle, and not yet hardened into the bone of manhood.
Page 372 - Phoebus replied, and touched my trembling ears; "Fame is no plant that grows on mortal soil, Nor in the glistering foil Set off to the world, nor in broad rumour lies, But lives and spreads aloft by those pure eyes, And perfect witness of all-judging Jove; As he pronounces lastly on each deed, Of so much fame in Heaven expect thy meed.
Page 202 - ... to the middle of the river Apalachicola, or Catahouche ; thence along the middle thereof to its junction with the Flint river ; thence straight to the head of St. Mary's river ; and thence down along the middle of St. Mary's river to the Atlantic ocean.
Page 205 - States, and be settled and formed into distinct republican States, which shall become members of the Federal Union, and have the same rights of sovereignty, freedom, and independence, as the other States...
Page 256 - Congress concerning the commercial intercourse between the United States and Great Britain and France and their dependencies...
Page 217 - It is at all times difficult to draw with precision the line between those rights which must be surrendered, and those which may be reserved...
Page 266 - November they will cease to have effect; it being understood that, in consequence of this declaration, the English shall revoke their orders in council, and renounce the new principles of blockade, which they have wished to establish; or that the United States, conformably to the act you have just communicated, shall cause their rights to be respected by the English.
Page 198 - I am compelled to declare it as my deliberate opinion that if this bill passes, the bonds of this Union are virtually dissolved ; that the States which compose it are free from their moral obligations ; and that, as it will be the right of all, so it will be the duty of some, to prepare definitely for a separation amicably if they can, violently if they must.
Page 196 - The Constitution has made no provision for our holding foreign territory, still less for incorporating foreign nations into our Union. The Executive, in seizing the fugitive occurrence which so much advances the good of their country, have done an act beyond the Constitution.
Page 197 - MR. SPEAKER: I address you, sir, with anxiety and distress of mind, with me, wholly unprecedented. The friends of this bill seem to consider it as the exercise of a common power; as an ordinary affair; a mere municipal regulation, which they expect to see pass without other questions than those concerning details. But, sir, the principle of this bill materially affects the liberties and rights of the whole people of the United States. To me it appears that it would justify a revolution in this country;...

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