Fasti

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, May 21, 1998 - History - 291 pages
5 Reviews
Book IV of the Fasti, Ovid's celebration of the Roman calendar and its associated legends, is the book of April and honours the festivals of Venus, Cybele, Ceres, and their cult, as well as the traditional date of the foundation of Rome and many religious and civic anniversaries. Elaine Fantham accompanies her commentary with a revised text and an extended introduction. Besides including surveys of language, style, versification, and textual transmission, the introduction looks at the shifting generic traditions of Greek and Roman elegy, and situates Ovid's composite poem in its Augustan literary and historical context. Other sections explain the recurring religious, astronomical and dynastic material of the Fasti. It has been a particular concern to relate features of Book IV to the other books of the Fasti and to Ovid's other elegiac works, and the Metamorphoses.
  

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Review: Fasti

User Review  - Charles Pearce - Goodreads

A verse translation of poetry. Mainly an explanation of why the Romans celebrated things on the days they did, and/or the origin of the event. Many of these items were wrong. Also explanations of the name of the month. Read full review

Review: Fasti

User Review  - Evan Leach - Goodreads

The Fasti is an exploration of the ancient roman calendar. Written by Ovid in the early first century, only six books of the poem are extant today (one for each month from January through June ... Read full review

Contents

IV
1
V
4
VI
25
VII
42
VIII
49
IX
53
X
57
XI
87
XII
277
XIII
285
XV
287
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About the author (1998)

Publius Ovidius Naso (20 March 43 BC--AD 17/18), known as Ovid. Born of an equestrian family in Sulmo, Ovid was educated in rhetoric in Rome but gave it up for poetry. He counted Horace and Propertius among his friends and wrote an elegy on the death of Tibullus. He became the leading poet of Rome but was banished in 8 A.D. by an edict of Augustus to remote Tomis on the Black Sea because of a poem and an indiscretion. Miserable in provincial exile, he died there ten years later. His brilliant, witty, fertile elegiac poems include Amores (Loves), Heroides (Heroines), and Ars Amatoris (The Art of Love), but he is perhaps best known for the Metamorphoses, a marvelously imaginative compendium of Greek mythology where every story alludes to a change in shape. Ovid was admired and imitated throughout the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, and Jonson knew his works well. His mastery of form, gift for narration, and amusing urbanity are irresistible.

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