Notes and Queries (Google eBook)

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Oxford University Press, 1893 - Questions and answers
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Page 103 - tis his will : Let but the commons hear this testament, (Which, pardon me, I do not mean to read) And they would go and kiss dead Caesar's wounds, And dip their napkins in his sacred blood ; Yea, beg a hair of him for memory, And, dying, mention it within their wills, Bequeathing it, as a rich legacy, Unto their issue.
Page 159 - He nothing common did or mean Upon that memorable scene, But with his keener eye The axe's edge did try; Nor called the gods, with vulgar spite, To vindicate his helpless right, But bowed his comely head Down, as upon a bed.
Page 23 - The sky is changed! and such a change! Oh, night, And storm, and darkness, ye are wondrous strong, Yet, lovely in your strength, as is the light Of a dark eye in woman! Far along, From peak to peak, the rattling crags among Leaps the live thunder! Not from one lone cloud, But every mountain now hath found a tongue, And Jura answers, through her misty shroud, Back to the joyous Alps, who call to her aloud!
Page 163 - He is made one with nature; there is heard His voice in all her music, from the moan Of thunder to the song of night's sweet bird: He is a presence to be felt and known In darkness and in light, from herb and stone, Spreading itself where'er that Power may move Which has withdrawn his being to its own; Which wields the world with never-wearied love, Sustains it from beneath, and kindles it above.
Page 137 - Warwick in blood did wade, Oxford the foe invade, And cruel slaughter made Still as they ran up: Suffolk his axe did ply, Beaumont and Willoughby Bare them right doughtily, Ferrers and Fanhope. Upon Saint Crispin's day...
Page 10 - Yet must I not give nature all; thy art, My gentle Shakespeare, must enjoy a part; For though the poet's matter nature be, His art doth give the fashion; and that he Who casts to write a living line, must sweat, Such as thine are, and strike the second heat Upon the muses...
Page 185 - Oh lasting as those colours may they shine, Free as thy stroke, yet faultless as thy line ; New graces yearly like thy works display...
Page 75 - Since once I sat upon a promontory, And heard a mermaid, on a dolphin's back, Uttering such dulcet and harmonious breath, That the rude sea grew civil at her song ; And certain stars shot madly from their spheres, To hear the sea-maid's music.
Page 193 - Prospects of the National Society for the Education of the Poor in the Principles of the Established Church.
Page 137 - They now to fight are gone, Armour on armour shone, Drum now to drum did groan, To hear was wonder ; That with the cries they make, The very earth did shake, Trumpet to trumpet spake, Thunder to thunder.

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