The Right to Fight: A History of African Americans in the Military

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Da Capo Press, 2001 - History - 529 pages
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From the birth of the United States, African American men and women have fought and died in defense of a nation that has often denied them many fundamental rights of citizenship. Now Gerald Astor has chronicled their efforts and accomplishments in this critically acclaimed survey. From Crispus Attucks, the first casualty of the American Revolution, to fighters on both sides of the Civil War, Astor moves to the postwar Indian campaigns and the infamous Brownsville riot. He also documents the prejudices and grievous wrongs that have kept African Americans from service—and finally traces their ascent to the highest levels. The Right to Fight is a groundbreaking contribution to American history.
  

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Contents

The Long Voyage
1
The Straggle Begins
6
The Civil War
20
The Buffalo Soldiers
43
The War with Spain
56
New Beginnings and Brownsville Texas
76
Navy White Pancho Villa and Houston
90
World War I
108
The End of the War and Return to the Past
277
Postmortems and Fullbacks
305
The Walls Begin to Tumble
323
Korea
350
Integration Begins
374
Policy and People
399
Vietnam
420
Rough Seas Turbulent Air
445

Between the Wars
125
The Coming of World War II
145
Command and Control
165
Soldiers Airmen Sailors and Marines
188
Combat and Other Batdes
231
Forward Movement and Reversals
259
Shifting Sands Setding Down
480
AfterAction Critique
499
Roll Call
512
Bibliography
519
Index
521
Copyright

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About the author (2001)

Gerald Astor is a prominent military historian and author whose previous books include A Blood-Dimmed Tide, The Greatest War, and The Mighty Eighth. He lives near New York City.

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