The Halloween tree

Front Cover
Knopf; [distributed by Random House, Aug 28, 2007 - Juvenile Fiction - 145 pages
19 Reviews
Illustrated in black-and-white. Now back in print is the stunning
contemporary classic by American literary treasure Ray Bradbury, author of
"Fahrenheit 451" and "The Martian Chronicles." Meet the mysterious
Mr. Moonshroud, who leads eight boys on a journey back through the centuries to
discover the real meaning of Halloween. Prose of exquisite beauty will send
shivers of delight--and terror--through readers, who will want to take this
trip over and over again, long after the last jack-o'-lantern has gone dark.

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Reviewed by Marie Robinson for TeensReadToo.com
Opening this book is like opening a present. Originally published in 1972, publisher Alfred A. Knopf has printed a new hardcover edition. The dust
-jacket is beautifully illustrated, the book is of an unusual size. Everything about it says "special."
Inside, I was not disappointed. Bradbury swept me away with his opening scene:
"It was a small town by a small river and a small lake in a small northern part of a Midwest state. There wasn't so much wilderness around you couldn't see the town. But on the other hand there wasn't so much town you couldn't see and feel and touch and smell the wilderness. The town was full of trees. And dry grass and dead flowers now that autumn was here. And full of fences to walk on and sidewalks to skate on and a large ravine to tumble in and yell across. And the town was full of...
Boys.
And it was the afternoon of Halloween.
And all the houses shut against a cool wind.
And the town was full of cold sunlight.
But suddenly, the day was gone.
Night came out from under each tree and spread."
This scene sets the tone for the entire book. THE HALLOWEEN TREE is as classic a Halloween story as A CHRISTMAS CAROL is for Christmas. It is about a group of boys, all friends, ages 11-12, who dress up for their annual night of Halloween mischief and go trick or treating. The boys find themselves at a particularly spooky mansion in a dark ravine, with a Marley-the-ghost door knocker and a gigantic tree covered with jack-o-lanterns. As the jack-o-lanterns light up one by one, the boys realize they are in the presence of a Halloween Tree, and that something very special is about to happen.
The resident of the house, the mysterious Mr. Moundshroud, takes the boys on a fantastic journey through traditions of Halloween past. This story is part history lesson, but the history is provided in such a compelling way that your average reader won't even realize he or she is learning something.
Perhaps the only downside to this story is that it is so dominantly geared toward a male audience. All of the major characters are male. Though, being female myself, I could get lost in the spookiness of the narrative.
Bradbury uses his trademark short sentences which are short on exposition but long on crafting a mood. The story is spooky without ever being scary, and is sure to delight kids of all ages.
 

Review: The Halloween Tree

User Review  - Quentin Wallace - Goodreads

I liked this one. In this story Bradbury basically gives an abbreviated history of Halloween and also shows how different countries and cultures celebrate the holiday, all wrapped up in an interesting ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
9
Section 2
13
Section 3
17
Copyright

13 other sections not shown

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About the author (2007)

Ray Bradbury is America's foremost writer of science fiction and fantasy. Among his most popular adult books are Fahrenheit 451, The Martian
Chronicles, The Illustrated Man, Dandelion Wine, and Death Is a Lonely Business. In addition, he has written several books for children, including Switch on the Night. He lives in Los Angeles, California.

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