Handbook of flower pollination: based upon Hermann Müller's work ʻThe fertilisation of flowers by insectsʼ, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Clarendon press, 1908 - Fertilization of plants
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Contents

Ranunculus Flammula L after Herm Miiller
23
Ranunculus auricomus L after Herm Miiller
29
Caltha palustris L after Herm Miiller
34
Trollius europaeus L after Herm Miiller
35
Helleborus foetidus L from nature
37
Helleborus viridis L from nature
38
Nigella L from nature
40
Aquilegia vulgaris L from nature
42
Delphinium elatum L after Herm Miiller
45
Stages in Specialization of the Nectaries of Aconitum after Kronfeld
48
Map showing the distribution of the genera Aconitum and Bombus after Kronfeld
49
Aconitum Napellus L after Herm Miiller
50
Aconitum Lycoctonum L after Herm Miiller
51
Calycanthaceae Lindl
53
Magnoliaceae DC
54
Berberideae Va1l
55
Nymphaeaceae DC
59
Sarraceniaceae Endl
60
Papaveraceae DC
61
Chelidonium majus L after Hildebrand
64
Diclytra spectabilis DC after Hildebrand
68
Corydalis cava Schweigg et Kort from nature
70
Fumaria officinalis L after Hildebrand
73
Cruciferae Juss
74
Nectaries of some Cruciferae after Prantl
76
Matthiola incana R Br from nature
77
Nasturtium sylvestre R Br after Herm Miiller
80
Arabis alpina L after Herm Miiller
83
Sisymbrium from nature
92
Lunaria annua L from nature
106
Draba aizoides L after Herm Miiller
108
Kernera saxatilis Reichb after Herm M1iller
110
Tecsdalia nudicaulis R Br after Herm Miiller
115
Biscutella laevigata L after Herm Miiller
117
Capparideae Juss
128
Reseda odorata L after Herm Miiller
130
Cistineae Dunal
131
Violarieae DC
135
Viola calcarata L after Herm Miiller
138
Viola biflora Z after Herm Miiller
139
Viola pinnata L after Herm Miiller
141
Viola arenaria DC after Herm M1iller
142
Polygaleae Juss
146
4a Polygala Chamaebuxus L after Herm Miiller
148
Caryophylleae Juss 149
149
Gypsophila paniculata L after Herm Miiller
151
Gypsophila repens L after Herm Miiller
152
Dianthus deltoides L after Herm Miiller
153
Dianthus superbus L after Herm Miiller
155
Dianthus Carthusianorum L from nature
156
Silene n1pestris L after Herm Miiller
164
Silene acaulis L after Herm Miiller
165
Cherleria sedoides L after Herm Miiller
180
Alsine verna Barl after Henr1 M1iller
181
Honckenya peploides Ehrh from nature
183
Moehringia muscosa L after Herm Miiller
184
Arenaria biflora L after Herm Miiller
185
Stellaria graminea L after Herm Miiller
187
Cerastium arvense L after Herm Miiller
194
Cerastium trigynum Vill after Herm Miiller
198
Cerastium latifolium L after Herm Miiller
199
Portulaceae Juss
201
Tamariscineae Desv
202
Elatineae Camb
203
Malvaceae R Br
206
Malva sylvestris L and M rotundifolia after Herm Miiller
208
Malva neglecta Wiih from nature
209
Geranium pusillum L after Henr1 Miiller
226
Erodium cicutarium LItrit from nature
230
Tropaeolum majus L from nature
233
Impatiens parviflora DC from nature
237
Impatiens glanduligera Lindl from nature
238
Rutaceae Juss
239
Dictamnus albus L from nature
240
Ilicineae DC
244
Rhamneae R Br
246
Rhamnus Frangula L after Henr1 Miiller
247
Ampelideae H B etK
250
Sapindaceae Juss
253
Aesculus Hippocastanum L after Herm M1iller
254
79 Acer L after F Pax
256
Anacardiaceae Lindl
258
Leguminosae Juss 259
259
Apios tuberosa Moenct after Taubert and Loew
261
Sarothamnus scoparius Koch after Herm Miiller
263
Genista tinctoria L after Herm Miiller
265
Genista anglica L after Henn Miiller
267
Ulex europaeus L from nature
268
Cytisus Laburnum L after Henn Miiller
269
Lupinus luteus L after Herm Miiller
272
Ononis spinosa L after Herm Miiller
273
Medicago sativa L after Herm Miiller
276
Medicago falcata L after Henn Miiller
278
Melilotus officinalis Will1l after Henn Miiller
283
Trifolium repens L after Herm Miiller
285
Trifolium pratense L after Herm Miiller
289
Trifolium alpinum L after Herm Miiller
295
Trifolium pallescens Schreb after Herm Miiller
296
Trifolium badium Schrcb after Herm Miiller
297
Anthyllis Vulneraria L after Herm Miiller
299
Lotus corniculatus L after Herm Miiller
301
Robinia Pseudacacia L from nature
307
Astragalus depressus L after Herm Miiller
312
Coronilla vaginalis Lam after Herm Miiller
314
Hippocrepis comosa L after Herm Miiller
316
Hedysarum obscurum L after Herm Miiller
318
Onobrychis viciaefolia Scop after Herm Miiller
319
Vicia Cracca L after Herm Miiller
321
Vicia sepium L after Herm Miiller
323
Pisum sativum L after Herm Miiller
330
Lathyrus pratensis L after Herm Miiller
332
Phaseolus vulgaris L from nature and after Herm Miiller
339
Natural Order page XXXIV Rosaceae Juss
342
Rubus caesius L from nature
354
Rubus saxatilis L after Herm Miiller
357
Rubus arcticus L after E Warming
358
Dryas integrifolia Vahl after E Warming
360
Saxifrageae Vent
395
Crassulaceae DC
422
Droseraceae DC
431
Halorageae R Br
432
Melastomaceae R Br
434
Onagrarieae Juss
441
Loaseae Juss
453
Cucurbitaceae Juss
454
Cacteae DC 45
458
Umbelliferae Juss 459
459
Araliaceae Juss
519
Caprifoliaceae Juss
520
Rubiaceae DC
537
LIU Valerianae DC 549
549
Dipsaceae DC
557
Compositae Adans
568
Stylidieae R Br 73
605

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 45 - ... hollow cone to the front, and as they expand and turn up anteriorly, they afford a convenient approach to the proboscis of a humble-bee, and also direct it with certainty to the nectar receptacle. These anterior parts of the upper petals separate on slight pressure, so that the head of a humble-bee can be entirely thrust between them, thus diminishing the distance to the nectar by 6 to 7 mm.
Page i - Vol. II (II. Band. I. Teil of the German edition), 1908. Observations made in Europe and the Arctic Regions on species belonging to the natural orders. Ranunculaceae to Stylidieae. With a portrait of Miiller and 210 illustrations. Pp. viii + 704.
Page 436 - His experiments with this loosestrife also demonstrated that "reproductive organs, when of different length, behave to one another like different species of the same genus in regard both to direct productiveness and the character of the offspring ; and that consequently mutual barrenness, which was once thought conclusive proof of difference of species, is worthless as such, and the last barrier that was raised between species and varieties is broken down.
Page 44 - Delphinium datum, is described by Knuth as follows : 177 masterly fashion, the spur of the sepal not only serves to protect the nectar, but also compels the bumble-bees that alight in search of nectar to do so in the only way that effects pollination. The hollow, sharply conical end of the posterior process of each upper petal secretes nectar, getting so full of it that some enters the semiconical cavity of this process, which is open on its inner side.
Page 661 - ... Milwaukee, Wisconsin. Blooming freely, August 12, 1927. No honey bees. Centaurea L. Star Thistle Herbs with alternate leaves and single heads. Heads manyflowered. Flowers usually purplish, tubular, marginal flowers longer than neutral. Disc florets hermaphrodite. Filaments irritable to touch. Knuth says, "Kerner states that the pollen is concealed in the anther-cylinder until insects visit the florets, being thus protected from rain and dew. When the proboscis of a nectar-seeking insect stimulates...
Page 324 - ... The wings are violet in color and the keel is whitish with a blue tip. The keel and wings are united in such a way that to secure pollination the insect must light upon the keel, which is then pressed down and the stamens come in contact with the thorax of the bee. Knuth puts it in the following way, "The posterior angles of the carina are drawn out into processes which lie upon the sexual column. There are also finger-shaped alar processes, running backwards parallel to each other. The upper...
Page 276 - ... speak, fired off. He states that the upper surfaces of the alae are beset with papillae, serving as footholds to insect visitors. There is also a marginal row of papillae on either side of the vexillum's inner surface, to which long-legged insects would appear to cling. The stigma remains unreceptive until its papillae have been subjected to friction. By covering a number of inflorescences with nets, in order to keep away insects, Burkill was able to confirm the conclusion at which Urban had...
Page 260 - The carina is a protective structure, sheltering the stamens and pistils and keeping away unbidden guests (Lepidoptera and flies). When all ten filaments cohere, the flowers afford only pollen, but when the upper one is free, there is a slit on either side of it, leading to the nectar secreted inside the bases of the stamens. The closed or split cylinder formed by the filaments envelops the pistil, of which the style is usually upwardly curved at the tip, and projects somewhat beyond the anthers,...
Page 570 - ... is closely surrounded in the bud by an involucre usually made up of several series of bracts. This subsequently serves as an adequate protection against creeping animals, as well as to hold the inflorescence together. 672 corollas, or by the production of a limb of each into a long outer lobe. ' ' Nectar is secreted by a ridge surrounding the base of the style. It is so abundant as to rise in the corolla-tube and is protected from rain by the filaments which converge above it. It is accessible...
Page 44 - ... masterly fashion, the spur of the sepal not only serves to protect the nectar, but also compels the bumble-bees that alight in search of nectar to do so in the only way that effects pollination. The hollow, sharply conical end of the posterior process of each upper petal secretes nectar, getting so full of it that some enters the semiconical cavity of this process, which is open on its inner side. As the two spurs are closely apposed they together form a hollow cone, splitting at the end into...

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