Body Evidence: Intimate Violence Against South Asian Women in America

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Shamita Das Dasgupta
Rutgers University Press, 2007 - Family & Relationships - 305 pages
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"This book offers powerful insights into the experiences of South Asian battered women in the U.S."-Natalie Sokoloff, professor of sociology, John Jay College of Criminal Justice, City University of New York "If you can read just one book to understand domestic violence in this country, read Body Evidence. Dasgupta brings brilliant voices together to explicate the meanings of sexuality, class, ethnicity, gender, and legal status in the struggle to end violence against women in intimate relationships."-Dr. Ellen Pence, director of Praxis International "The strength of this volume lies in its diversity of views. This book brings a new set of articles into the discourse on violence against women."-Margaret Abraham, author of Speaking the Unspeakable: Marital Violence among South Asian Immigrants in the United States When South Asians immigrated to the United States in the 1970s, they were passionately driven to achieve economic stability and socialize the next generation to retain the traditions of their home culture. The immigrant community went to great lengths to project an impeccable public image by denying the existence of social problems such as domestic violence, sexual assault, mental illness, racism, and intergenerational conflict. It was not until recently that activist groups have worked to bring these issues out into the open. In Body Evidence, more than twenty scholars and public health professionals uncover the unique challenges faced by victims of domestic violence in South Asian American communities. Topics include cultural obsession with women's chastity and virginity; the continued silence surrounding family-based child sexual abuse and intimate violence among women who identify themselves as lesbian, bisexual, or transgender; the consequences of refusing marriage proposals or failing to meet dowry demands; and, ultimately, the ways in which the U.S. courts often confuse and exacerbate the plights of these women. Shamita Das Dasgupta is an adjunct assistant professor of clinical law at New York University's School of Law and cofounder of Manavi, Inc.
  

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Contents

PART
9
The Many Faces of Domestic Violence in
24
Reflecting on Marital Violence
38
Sexuality in the Context
53
An AntiDomestic
68
Mental and Emotional Wounds of Domestic Violence
81
Violence and Body Image among South Asian
94
Silences That Prevail When the Perpetrators Are Our Own
107
A Communicative Perspective on Assisting Battered
164
Laws Culture and Cultural Difference
181
The H4 Visa Bind
195
Battered South Asian Women in U S Courts
211
PART FOUR
227
Transnational Exploitation
243
Tracing the Trajectory of
258
References
275

Invisibility
126
Battered South Asian
139
Ahimsa and the Contextual Realities of Woman Abuse
152
Author Biographies
295
Copyright

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About the author (2007)

Shamita Das Dasgupta is an adjunct assistant professor of clinical law at New York University's School of Law and cofounder of Manavi, Inc.

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