Sweet Thursday (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Penguin, Jul 29, 2008 - Fiction - 288 pages
19 Reviews
In Monterey, on the California coast, Sweet Thursday is what they call the day after Lousy Wednesday, which is one of those days that are just naturally bad. Returning to the scene of Cannery Row—the weedy lots and junk heaps and flophouses of Monterey, John Steinbeck once more brings to life the denizens of a netherworld of laughter and tears—from Doc, based on Steinbeck’s lifelong friend Ed Ricketts, to Fauna, new headmistress of the local brothel, to Hazel, a bum whose mother must have wanted a daughter. This Penguin Classics edition features an introduction and notes by Robert DeMott.
  

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Review: Sweet Thursday

User Review  - Vionna - Goodreads

A sequel to Cannery Row when Doc, a marine biologist, returns from WWII to find the canning industry in tatters along with his business of providing marine specimens to university. Most of the great ... Read full review

Review: Sweet Thursday

User Review  - Ashley - Goodreads

very cute book! i love john steinbeck, he is one of my favorites! i hope doc & suzy lived happily ever after and she got her gold star :] "i'm sure we should all be as happy as kings" Read full review

All 19 reviews »

Contents

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ix
II
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III
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XXX
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XXXVI
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XXXVII
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XXXVIII
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XXXIX
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XL
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XLI
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XLII
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Copyright

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About the author (2008)

No writer is more quintessentially American than John Steinbeck. Born in 1902 in Salinas, California, Steinbeck attended Stanford University before working at a series of mostly blue-collar jobs and embarking on his literary career. Profoundly committed to social progress, he used his writing to raise issues of labor exploitation and the plight of the common man, penning some of the greatest American novels of the twentieth century and winning such prestigious awards as the Pulitzer Prize and the National Book Award. He received the Nobel Prize in 1962, "for his realistic and imaginative writings, combining as they do sympathetic humour and keen social perception." Today, more than thirty years after his death, he remains one of America's greatest writers and cultural figures.

Robert DeMott is the Edwin and Ruth Kennedy Distinguished Professor of English at Ohio University in Athens. His recent books include "Steinbeck's Typewriter: Essays on His Art" (1996), "Dave Smith: A Literary Archive" (2000), and "The Weather in Athens" (2001).

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