Reforming Education: The Opening of the American Mind

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Collier Books, 1990 - Education - 362 pages
10 Reviews
Spanning the breadth of his career, from 1939 to 1989, this book is the response from Mortimer J. Adler to the question What can be done about American education? For Adler the best education is one that offers the best education possible for all.

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Review: Reforming Education: The Opening of the American Mind

User Review  - Amanda Miranda-flores - Goodreads

I have read several books by Dr. Adler and like the others, this one will not disappoint. Read full review

Review: Reforming Education: The Opening of the American Mind

User Review  - Goodreads

I have read several books by Dr. Adler and like the others, this one will not disappoint. Read full review

Contents

This Prewar Generation 1940
3
The Chicago School 1941
21
Liberalism and Liberal Education 1939
40
Copyright

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About the author (1990)

Born in New York, Mortimer Adler was educated at Columbia University. Later as a philosophy instructor there, he taught in a program focused on the intellectual foundations of Western civilization. Called to the University of Chicago in 1927 by President Robert Maynard Hutchins, Adler played a major role in renovating the undergraduate curriculum to center on the "great books." His philosophical interests committed to the dialectical method crystallized in a defense of neo-Thomism, but he never strayed far from concerns with education and other vital public issues. From 1942 to 1945, Adler was director of the Institute for Philosophical Research, based in San Francisco, California. Beginning in 1945 he served as associate editor of Great Books of the Western World series, and in 1952 he published Syntopicon, an analytic index of the great ideas in the great books. In 1966 he became director of the editorial planning for the fifteen edition of the Encyclopaedia Britannica, and in 1974, chairman of its editorial board. Adler has been devoted in recent years to expounding his interpretations of selected great ideas and to advocating his Paideia Proposal. That proposal would require that all students receive the same quantity and quality of education, which would concentrate on the study of the great ideas expressed in the great books, a study conducted by means of the dialectical method. Mortimer J. Adler died June 28, 2001 at his home in San Mateo, California at the age of 98.

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