The works of John Marston, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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J.C. Nimmo, 1887
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Page xlv - Know that I have not laboured in this poem to tie myself to relate anything as an historian, but to enlarge everything as a poet. To transcribe authors, quote authorities, and translate Latin prose orations into English blank verse, hath, in this subject, been the least aim of my studies.
Page xxx - Or itch t have me their adversary, I know not, Or all these mixt; but sure I am, three years They did provoke me with their petulant styles On every stage: and I at last unwilling, But weary, I confess, of so much trouble, Thought I would try if shame could win upon 'em...
Page li - Was parmaceti, for an inward bruise ; And that it was great pity, so it was, That villainous salt-petre should be digg'd Out of the bowels of the harmless earth...
Page 99 - And all part pleased in most wish'd content! But sweat of Hercules can ne'er beget So blest an issue. Therefore, we proclaim, If any spirit breathes within this round, Uncapable of weighty passion, (As from his birth being hugged in the arms, And nuzzled...
Page lx - Lord of light is light itself, and never spark of that light reach to my soul ; what Tophet is not paradise, what brimstone is not amber, what gnashing is not a comfort, what gnawing of the worm is not a tickling, what torment is not a marriage-bed to this damnation, to be secluded eternally, eternally, eternally from the sight of God...
Page xxxviii - ... only a few industrious Scots, perhaps, who, indeed, are dispersed over the face of the whole earth. But as for them, there are no greater friends to Englishmen and England, when they are out on't, in the world, than they are. And for my...
Page 51 - And from the height of contemplation, Have view'd the feeble joints men totter on. I envy none; but hate, or pity all. For when I view, with an intentive thought, That creature fair but proud; him rich, but sot; Th...
Page 301 - I perceive when all is done, there is of women, as of all other things, some good, most bad ; some saints, some sinners : for as nowa-days, no courtier but has his mistress, no captain but has his cockatrice*, no cuckold but has his horns, and no fool but has his feather...
Page 203 - Why not Malevole in folio with us, as Jeronimo in decimo-sexto with them ? They taught us a name for our play; we call it One for another.
Page xxxii - Now, sir, whereas the ingenuity of the time and the soul's Synderisis are but embrions in nature, added to the paunch of Esquiline, and the inter-vallum of the zodiac, besides the ecliptic line being optic, and not mental, but by the contemplative and theoric part thereof, doth demonstrate to us the vegetable circumference, and the ventosity of the tropics...

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