The Divine Classic of Nan-hua: Being the Works of Chuang Tsze, Taoist Philosopher. With an Excursus, and Copious Annotations in English and Chinese (Google eBook)

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Kelley & Walsh, 1881 - Taoism - 425 pages
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Contents

I
xi
II
1
III
10
IV
32
V
37
VI
56
VII
68
VIII
89
XVIII
196
XX
213
XXI
221
XXII
235
XXIII
249
XXIV
261
XXV
277
XXVI
292

IX
98
X
105
XI
110
XII
118
XIII
134
XIV
155
XV
170
XVI
186
XVII
191
XXVII
313
XXVIII
329
XXIX
339
XXX
346
XXXI
358
XXXII
375
XXXIII
391
XXXIV
410
XXXV
416

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Popular passages

Page 77 - The determined scholar and the man of virtue will not seek to live at the expense of injuring their virtue, They will even sacrifice their lives to preserve their virtue complete.
Page xxvii - ... virtue is complete, is yet to outward seeming stupid. Put away your proud air and many desires, your insinuating habit and wild will. These are of no advantage to you. This is all which I have to tell you.
Page xxv - The Master being very sick, Tsze-loo asked leave to pray for him. He said, "May such a thing be done?" Tsze-loo replied, "It may. In the Prayers it is said, 'Prayer has been made to the spirits of the upper and lower worlds.
Page xxxvii - Whereupon Wang Chih proceeding to pick up his ax1 found that its handle had moldered into dust. On repairing to his home he discovered that centuries had passed since the time when he had left it for the mountains, and that no vestige of his kinsfolk remained. Retiring to a retreat among the hills, he devoted himself to the rites of Taoism, and finally attained immortality"1 — a conclusion only differing in degree from that of Kip's adventure, whose immortality is of another sort.
Page xxxvii - It is long since you came here ; you should go home now ! ' Whereupon Wang Chih, proceeding to pick up his axe, found that its handle had mouldered into dust.
Page 145 - There is a contrivance here, by means of which a hundred plots of ground may be irrigated in one day. With the expenditure of a very little strength, the result accomplished is great. Would you, Master, not like (to try it) ?' The gardener looked up at him, and said, ' How does it work ?' 3 ze 'kung said, 'It is a lever made of wood, heavy behind, and light in front.
Page xxiv - Those whom you talk about are dead, and their bones are mouldered to dust; only their words remain. When the superior man gets his time, he mounts aloft; but when the time is against him, he moves as if his feet were entangled. I have heard that a good merchant, though he has rich treasures deeply stored, appears as if he were poor, and that the superior man whose virtue is complete, is yet to outward seeming stupid.
Page xxii - From the loving example of one family, a whole State becomes loving, and from its courtesies, the whole State becomes courteous, while, from the ambition and perverseness of the one man, the whole State may be led to rebellious disorder ; — such is the nature of the influence. This verifies the saying, " Affairs may be ruined by a single sentence ; a kingdom may be settled by its one man.
Page xiv - It is by the Odes that the mind is aroused. "It is by the Rules of Propriety that the character is established. "It is from Music that the finish is received.
Page 108 - Can you, leaving untouched the nature of the willow, make with it cups and bowls ? You must do violence and injury to the willow, before you can make cups and bowls with it.

References from web pages

Zhuangzi - Nan Hua Zhen Jing (The Divine Classic of Nan-Hua ...
Posted in Literature, Movies/Books, Psychology, World History by huehueteotl on October 5th, 2007. Dschuang Dsi: Das wahre Buch vom südlichen Blütenland. ...
huehueteotl.wordpress.com/ 2007/ 10/ 05/ zhuangzi-nan-hua-zhen-jing-the-divine-classic-of-nan-hua/

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