A Catalogue of the Fruits Cultivated in the Garden of the Horticultural Society of London (Google eBook)

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Society, 1831 - Fruit-culture - 165 pages
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Page iv - But this is not the only improvement ; " by columns and abbreviations the meaning of which is explained under every different kind of fruit, a large number of the most important characters by which the varieties are distinguished has been compressed into a very small compass. Thus, in apples, the following line 8i6 Oslin py roundish 2 T 1 Aug.
Page 72 - ... 1835. In it I proposed the practical application of my mode of grafting to the economical and expeditious proving of the unproved varieties of the vine. This was suggested by the following notice in the Catalogue of Fruits grown in the London Horticultural Society's Garden in 1831, under the article " Grapes : " " The varieties of grapes are found to be in great confusion ; and much difference of opinion exists respecting the comparative merits, as well as the nomenclature, of many of the...
Page v - Cattleyanum, which occupies a permanent situation in one of the vineries, where it bears abundantly. In conclusion, it is due to Mr. Robert Thompson, who has the charge of the fruit department in the garden of the Society, to state that the value of this catalogue, whatever it may be, is principally due to his assiduity and pomological knowledge.
Page iv - Aug. Sept. signifies that the Oslin is a pale yellow apple of a roundish figure, of a middling size, used for the dessert, of the first quality, and ripening in August and September. To these abbreviations a few useful remarks have often been added in a separate column.
Page iii - IL p. 208.), and blamed the alphabetical arrangement as half scientific and half popular. The present edition is entirely popular ; the fruits being arranged according to the names in common use, and not according to those of botanists. But this is not the only improvement ; " by columns and abbreviations the meaning of which is explained under every different kind of fruit, a large number of the most important characters by which the varieties are distinguished has been compressed into a very small...
Page 72 - Gardening. meantime, the generally known and acknowledged merits and characters of some have been given ; others, less certain, have been left without attaching any remark till circumstances admit of the whole being properly examined.
Page iv - In the former edition, a number of fruits, both of hardy and of tender kinds, were comprehended which are here omitted ; such, for instance, as bilberries, hawthorns, brambles, oranges, guavas, and the like. They have now been left out for several reasons. By far the greater part, although eatable, are not fit for cultivation as fruit ; such as hawthorns, brambles, and whortleberries, which ought only to be found in an enumeration of trees and shrubs; others can scarcely be considered eatable at...
Page iii - Catalogue was published, in l826, it was considered that the progress which had then been made in determining the qualities and synonyms, and in settling the nomenclature of Fruits, was not such as to justify the Society in attempting more than a mere list of their names. The subsequent experience of five years has so considerably diminished the difficulties which were then supposed to exist, that the Council have at length found themselves authorized in ordering the preparation of that which is...
Page v - ... eatable at all, as viburnums and many of the American grapes ; and a third class is cultivated in this country for the flowers rather than the fruit, as the orange tribe. But what has chiefly caused the omission of the latter, and of other tender fruits, has been that in the present state of the gardens there are no means of cultivating them, with a view either to fruiting or to distribution. To this there is only one exception in the purple guava, or Psidium Cattleyanum, which occupies a permanent...
Page 163 - July woolly. the Prolific, and also those sterile plants commonly called Males, which have long stamens. The latter ought in all cases to be entirely destroyed. They may be distinguished from the prolific by their flowers being scarcely so large, and the receptacle of the fructification small and imperfect.

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