The Iliad

Front Cover
Wordsworth Editions, Jan 1, 1995 - Fiction - 351 pages
1154 Reviews
The product of more than a decade's continuous work (1598-1611), Chapman's translation of Homer's great poem of war is a magnificent testimony to the power of The Iliad. In muscular, onward-rolling verse Chapman retells the story of Achilles, the great warrior, and his terrible wrath before the walls of besieged Troy, and the destruction it wreaks on both Greeks and Trojans. Chapman regarded the translation of this epic, and of Homer's Odyssey (also available in Wordsworth Editions) as his life's work, and dedicated himself to capturing the 'soul' of the poem.
  

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5 stars
493
4 stars
316
3 stars
220
2 stars
80
1 star
45

So far the prose is fantastic. - Goodreads
The classic, but it can be boring and hard to read. - Goodreads
Liked everything but the battle scenes. - Goodreads
Introduction is awfully important. - Goodreads
It has a good ending. - Goodreads
Good book but it is slightly difficult to read - Goodreads

Review: The Iliad

User Review  - Dominika Kaníková - Goodreads

Well, what can i say. Maybe im not that into this kind of poems but i didn´t really enjoyed the whole story in fact, i could not even catch the point of it. For me it was hard reading and i couldn´t ... Read full review

Review: The Iliad

User Review  - Mark - Goodreads

No one said that the Iliad would be an easy read, and it's not. The language used is, at times, archaic and the structure of the story itself is not something that modern readers will be accustomed to ... Read full review

All 11 reviews »

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
3
Section 2
5
Section 3
19
Section 4
41
Section 5
43
Section 6
55
Section 7
71
Section 8
95
Section 15
223
Section 16
237
Section 17
257
Section 18
279
Section 19
297
Section 20
313
Section 21
325
Section 22
339

Section 9
111
Section 10
123
Section 11
155
Section 12
169
Section 13
189
Section 14
203
Section 23
355
Section 24
369
Section 25
371
Section 26
391
Section 27
413
Copyright

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About the author (1995)

Homer is celebrated as the greatest of ancient Greek epic poets. These epics lie at the beginning of the Western canon of literature, and have had an enormous influence on the history of literature.

Adam Roberts is Reader in Nineteenth-Century Literature, Royal Holloway, University of London.

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