The Writings of George Washington: Life of Washington (Google eBook)

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American Stationers' Company, John B. Russell, 1837 - Presidents
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Page 493 - There is a rank due to the United States among nations, which will be withheld, if not absolutely lost, by the reputation of weakness. If we desire to avoid insult, we must be able to repel it; if we desire to secure peace, one of the most powerful instruments of our rising prosperity, it must be known, that we are at all times ready for war.
Page 129 - The Convention met at Williamsburg on the day proposed. Washington was a member from Fairfax County. One of the principal acts of this Convention was to adopt a new Association, more extensive in its prohibitions than the former, and fixing on certain times when all further intercourse with British merchants, both by imports and exports, was to be suspended, unless the offensive acts of Parliament should previously be repealed. In its general features, this Association was nearly the same as the...
Page 444 - I have been too much swayed by a grateful remembrance of former instances, or by an affectionate sensibility to this transcendent proof of the confidence of my fellowcitizens ; and have thence too little consulted my incapacity as well as disinclination for the weighty and untried cares before me ; my error will be palliated by the motives which misled me, and its consequences be judged by my country with some share of the partiality in which they originated.
Page 572 - ... knowledge in the principles of politics and good government, and, as a matter of infinite importance in my judgment, by associating with each other and forming friendships in juvenile years, be enabled to free themselves in a proper degree from those local prejudices and habitual jealousies which have just been mentioned, and which, when carried to excess, are never-failing sources of disquietude to the public mind, and pregnant of mischievous consequences to this country.
Page 444 - In this conflict of emotions, all I dare aver, is, that it has been my faithful study to collect my duty from a just appreciation of every circumstance by which it might be affected.
Page 429 - Union, at a time and place to be agreed upon, to take into consideration the trade of the United States ; to consider how far a uniform system in their commercial regulations may be necessary to their common interest and their permanent harmony ; and to report to the several States such an act, relative to this great object, as, when ratified by them, will enable the United States in Congress effectually to provide for the same.
Page 278 - We find gentlemen, without knowing whether the army was really going into winter-quarters or not, (for I am sure no resolution of mine would warrant the Remonstrance,) reprobating the measure as much as if they thought the soldiers were made of stocks or stones, and equally insensible of frost and snow...
Page 328 - ... twelve feet apart. Of late he has had the surprising sagacity to discover that apples will make pies, and it is a question, if, in the violence of his efforts, we do not get one of apples instead of having both of beefsteaks. If the ladies can put up with such entertainment, and will submit to partake of it on plates once tin but now iron (not become so by the labor of scouring), I shall be happy to see them.
Page 71 - As a remarkable instance of this, I may point out to the public that heroic youth, Colonel Washington, whom I cannot but hope Providence has hitherto preserved in so signal a manner for some important service to his country.
Page 413 - In the moment of our separation, upon the road as I travelled, and every hour since, I have felt all that love, respect, and attachment for you, with which length of years, close connexion, and your merits have inspired me. I often asked myself, as our carriages separated, whether that was the last sight I ever should have of you ? And, though I wished to say No, my fears answered Yes. I called to mind the days of my youth, and found they had long since fled to return no more ; that I was now descending...