Five Messages to Teachers of Primary Reading (Google eBook)

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Rand, McNally, 1913 - Reading (Elementary) - 219 pages
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Page 220 - And further, a true teacher never thinks his education complete, but is always seeking to add to his own knowledge. The moment any man ceases to be a systematic student, he ceases to be an effective teacher...
Page 98 - ... suggested for one day. GROUP I Teach the following phonic elements as memory facts: Family names: ack, eck, ick, ock, uck; ang, ing, ong, ung; ank, ink, unk; all, ell, ill; ar, er, ir, or, ur. Vowel equivalents and diphthongs: ay, ai, ee, oa, ea (long and short), oo (long and short), oi, oy, ou, ow. Double consonants: bl, br, cl, cr, dr, fl, fr, gl, gr, pi, pr, sk, si, sm, sn, sp, st, tr, sh, ch, wh, and th (hard and soft). Introduce these phonic elements while helping pupils analyze familiar...
Page 213 - Story Telling: What to Tell and How to Tell It Edna Lyman 19 Feeding the Family Mary S.
Page 103 - ... sound. Continue drill until pupils can recognize instantly, in any order, and pronounce the long family names given below: abe, ace, ade, afe, age, ake, ale, ame, ane, ange, ase, aste, ate, ave; eed, eef, eek, eel, eem, een, eep, eet, eer; ice, ide, ife, ike, ile, ime, ine, ipe, ire, ite, ive, ize; oke, ole, ome, one, ope, ore, ose, ote, ove; ube, une, ure, use, ute; ew.
Page 102 - ... hurt, burst, hurry, turkey. Introduce variety in order of family names as soon as possible. In addition to words listed above, teachers should help pupils build such other phonetic words as occur in book or board reading lessons. Example, "el," "elp," "help"; "il," "ilk," "silk"; "un," "unch,
Page 103 - I, II, and III are to the end that pupils may gain power for the work of Group IV. Let the exercises be so spirited that much ground may be covered daily in the five minutes devoted to this work. 1. Write words promiscuously on the board and ask pupils to pronounce the family names they know. For example, a pupil says, "I know 'et
Page 102 - ... pill, still, chill. car, far, jar, star, scar, March, card, hard, lard, garden, large, dark, mark, park, arm, harm, sharp, cart, part, tart, start, party, marbles, parlor. her, fern, serve; bird, third, girl, whirl, first, dirt, birthday; for, fork, form, corn, north, short; fur, pur, curl, burn, turn, churn, hurt, burst, hurry, turkey.
Page 103 - e" a matter of discussion but, rather, one of drill. Have pupils say "am" and "ame," as they drill upon these unmarked family names, as if each were only a simple sound. Continue drill until pupils can recognize instantly, in any order, and pronounce the long family names given below: abe, ace, ade, afe, age, ake, ale, ame, ane, ange, ase, aste, ate, ave; eed, eef, eek, eel, eem, een, eep, eet, eer; ice, ide, ife, ike, ile, ime, ine, ipe, ire, ite, ive...
Page 105 - Place on the board the familiar family names found in the words of the lesson, and have the pupils find the words in the book containing each and pronounce them. 3. Have pupils look at the book and tell the family names they recognize, then sound the words containing them. 4. Have pupils find all possible family names that have "a...
Page 100 - ai" aid, paid, laid, maid, afraid, braid; ail, fail, hail, mail, nail, pail, rail, sail, tail; ain, gain, pain, rain, brain, stain, plain, grain, chain, dainty; aise, raise; ait, wait; aint, paint. From "ee...

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