Cancer Ward: A Novel

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Macmillan, Nov 1, 1991 - Fiction - 560 pages
9 Reviews
Cancer Ward examines the relationship of a group of people in the cancer ward of a provincial Soviet hospital in 1955, two years after Stalin's death. We see them under normal circumstances, and also reexamined at the eleventh hour of illness. Together they represent a remarkable cross-section of contemporary Russian characters and attitudes. The experiences of the central character, Oleg Kostoglotov, closely reflect the author's own: Solzhenitsyn himself became a patient in a cancer ward in the mid-1950s, on his release from a labor camp, and later recovered. Translated by Nicholas Bethell and David Burg.
  

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Review: Cancer Ward

User Review  - Anirban - Goodreads

It is one of those books which hit you with its sheer brilliance and candor in representing the happenings of the story. Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn's third novel depicts the vacillation between ... Read full review

Review: Cancer Ward

User Review  - JoséMaría BlancoWhite - Goodreads

A masterpiece. After reading this tremendous novel I am convinced there are truly two levels of great writers or authors of fiction. Put in one sack the ones you care for, the ones you like best. I've ... Read full review

Contents

No Cancer Whatsoever
1
Education Doesnt Make You Smarter
10
Teddy Bear
26
The Patients Worries
40
The Doctors Worries
56
The Story of an Analysis
67
The Right to Treat
82
What Men Live By
96
Memories of Beauty
263
The Shadows Go Their Way
278
PART
293
The River that Flows into the Sands
295
Why Not Live Well?
303
Transfusion of Blood
326
Vega
341
Superb Initiative
355

Tumor Cordis
109
The Children
121
Cancer of the Birch Tree
135
Passions Return
155
and So Do the Specters
176
Justice
187
To Each Man His Own
200
Absurdities
212
1Z The Root from Issyk Kul
220
At the Graves Portals
236
Approaching the Speed of Light
247
Each Has His Own Interests
371
Bad Luck All Round
385
Hard Words Soft Words
400
The Old Doctor
416
Idols of the Market Place
433
The Other Side of the Coin
449
Happy Ending
463
and One a Bit Less Happy
476
The First Day of Creation
487
and the Last Day
512
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About the author (1991)

Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, winner of the 1970 Nobel Prize in Literature, was born in 1918. In February 1945, while he was captain of a reconnaissance battery of the Soviet Army, he was arrested and sentenced to an eight-year term in a labor camp and permanent internal exile, which was cut short by Khrushchev's reforms, allowing him to return from Kazakhstan to Central Russia in 1956. Although permitted to publish One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich in 1962--which remained his only full-length work to have appeared in his homeland until 1990--Solzhenitsyn was by 1969 expelled from the Writers' Union. The publication in the West of his other novels and, in particular, of The Gulag Archipelago, brought retaliation from the authorities. In 1974, Solzhenitsyn was arrested, stripped of his Soviet citizenship, and forcibly flown to Frankfurt. Solzhenitsyn and his wife and children moved to the United States in 1976. In September 1991, the Soviet government dismissed treason charges against him; Solzhenitsyn returned to Russia in 1994. He died in Moscow in 2008.

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