Merry England (Google eBook)

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1884
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Page 72 - Three per cent Interest, repayable on demand. The Bank undertakes for its Customers, free of charge, the custody of Deeds, Writings, and other Securities and Valuables ; the collection of Bills of Exchange, Dividends, and Coupons: and the purchase and sale of Stocks, Shares, and Annuities. Letters of Credit and Circular Notes issued. A Pamphlet, with full particulars, on application.
Page 153 - Ross," each lisping babe replies. Behold the market-place with poor o'erspread ! The Man of Ross divides the weekly bread : He feeds yon alms-house, neat, but void of state, Where Age and Want sit smiling at the gate ; Him portion'd maids, apprentic'd orphans blest, The young who labour, and the old who rest. Is any sick ? the Man of Ross relieves, Prescribes, attends, the medicine makes, and gives.
Page 144 - HOW TO PURCHASE A PLOT OF LAND FOR FIVE SHILLINGS PER MONTH, With Immediate Possession, either for Building or Gardening Purposes. Apply at the Office of the BIRKBECK FREEHOLD LAND SOCIETY.
Page 122 - ... possession of the present age: we ought to be entirely thankful for them, and entirely ashamed of ourselves if we make no good use of them. But we make the worst possible use, if we allow them to usurp the place of true books: for, strictly speaking, they are not books at all, but merely letters or newspapers in good print.
Page 153 - Or in proud falls magnificently lost, But clear and artless, pouring through the plain Health to the sick, and solace to the swain. Whose causeway parts the vale with shady rows? Whose seats the weary traveller repose ? Who taught that heaven-directed spire to rise ?
Page 216 - The Bank also receives money on Deposit at Three per cent, Interest, repayable on demand. The Bank undertakes for its Customers, free of charge, the custody of Deeds, Writings...
Page 203 - For them the Ceylon diver held his breath, And went all naked to the hungry shark ; For them his ears gush'd blood ; for them in death The seal on the cold ice with piteous bark Lay full of darts ; for them alone did seethe A. thousand men in troubles wide and dark : Half-ignorant, they turn'd an easy wheel, That set sharp racks at work, to pinch and peel.
Page 153 - The Man of Ross divides the weekly bread : He feeds yon almshouse, neat, but void of state, Where age and want sit smiling at the gate : Him portion'd maids, apprentic'd orphans blest, The young who labour, and the old who rest. Is any sick ? the Man of Ross relieves, Prescribes, attends, the medicine makes and gives: Is there a variance ? enter but his door, Balk'd are the courts, and contest is no more : Despairing quacks with curses fled the place, And vile attorneys, now a useless race.
Page 290 - ... and respected. Nothing affords me more pleasure than the reflection that my conduct has not given offence to any one ; but that, on the contrary, I have endeavoured to serve all persons to the best of my abilities. I advise you to do the same. With respect to the honours of the state, if you would live with security, accept only such as are bestowed on you by the laws and the favour of your fellow-citizens; for it is the exercise of that power which is obtained by violence, and not of that which...
Page 353 - There is also a small account of Virginia by Jefferson, and an epic by Joel Barlow ; and some pieces of pleasantry by Mr. Irving. But why should the Americans write books, when a six weeks' passage brings them, in their own tongue, our sense, science, and genius, in bales and hogsheads ? Prairies, steamboats, grist-mills, are their natural objects for centuries to come. Then, when they have got to the Pacific Ocean epic poems, plays, pleasures of memory, and all the elegant gratifications of...

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