The American conflict: a history of the great rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-'64 : it's causes, incidents, and results : intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases : with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery : from 1776 to the close of the war for the union, Volume 1 (Google eBook)

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O.D. Case & Company, 1865 - Slavery
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Page 84 - State, and is an integral party, its co-States forming, as to itself, the other party : that the Government created by this compact, was not made the exclusive or final judge of the extent of the powers delegated to itself; since that would have made its discretion, and not the Constitution, the measure of its powers; but that, as in all other cases of compact among powers having no common judge, each party has an equal right to judge for itself, as well of infractions as of the mode and measure...
Page 34 - Determined to keep open a market where men should be bought and sold, he has prostituted his negative for suppressing every legislative attempt to prohibit or to restrain this execrable commerce.
Page 41 - It is hereby ordained and declared, by the authority aforesaid That the following articles shall be considered as articles of compact between the original states, and the people and states, in the said territory, and forever remain unalterable, unless by common consent, to wit: ARTICLE I.
Page 265 - With the movements in this hemisphere we are of necessity more immediately connected, and by causes which must be obvious to all enlightened and impartial observers. The political system of the Allied Powers is essentially different in this respect from that of America.
Page 418 - If it were admitted that you who are dissatisfied hold the right side in the dispute, there still is no single good reason for precipitate action.
Page 176 - States; and the people of each State shall have free ingress and regress to and from any other State, and shall enjoy therein all the privileges of trade and commerce subject to the same duties, impositions, and restrictions as the inhabitants thereof respectively...
Page 416 - That there are persons in one section or another who seek to destroy the Union at all events and are glad of any pretext to do it I will neither affirm nor deny; but if there be such, I need address no word to them.
Page 417 - Why should there not be a patient confidence in the ultimate justice of the people? Is there any better or equal hope in the world? In our present differences is either party without faith of being in the right? If the Almighty Ruler of Nations, with his eternal truth and justice, be on your side of the North, or on yours of the South, that truth and that justice will surely prevail by the judgment of this great tribunal of the American people.
Page 417 - Suppose you go to war, you cannot fight always; and when, after much loss on both sides and no gain on either, you cease fighting, the identical old questions, as to terms of intercourse, are again upon you.
Page 83 - That the several States composing the United States of America are not united on the principle of unlimited submission to their General Government, but that, by a compact under the style and title of a Constitution for the United States...

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